1944 Grumman G-21A Goose, c/n B-101, CF-VFU, FIFT. Dockside somewhere up Knight Inlet, B.C., Canada in spring 1969.

[1959 Kodak Retina IIIS (Type 027) rangefinder 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 86125, with Schneider-Kreuznach Retina-Xenon 50-mm f/1.9 Synchro Compur lens, s/n 6841319; Kodak Plus-X Pan (ISO 125/22°) 36-exposure black & white negative film]


© Copyright photograph by Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg, 1969 / Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, March 2011





“The whole history of the Canadian North can be divided into two periods—before and after the aeroplane.”
Hugh L. Keenleyside, Deputy Canadian Minister of Mines and Resources, October 1949




Wednesday, June 29, 2011

1968 Hawker Siddeley HS 748-233 Series 2A, c/n 1661, C-FYDY, Air North, Yukon’s Airline

1968 Hawker Siddeley HS 748-233 Series 2A, c/n 1661, C-FYDY, Air North, Yukon’s Airline at South Terminal, Vancouver International Airport (YVR/CYVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C., Canada on Friday, June 17, 2011 at 11:52 PDT

1968 Hawker Siddeley HS 748-233 Series 2A, c/n 1661, C-FYDY, Air North, Yukon’s Airline (Air North Charter and Training Ltd.), Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada, based at Erik Nielsen Whitehorse International Airport (YXY/CYXY), Whitehorse, Yukon
  • powered by two 2,190-shp Rolls-Royce Dart 7 Mk. 534-2 turboprop engines with variable-pitch four-blade Dowty Rotol propellers
  • crew of three (pilot, co-pilot, passenger attendant), between 4 and 40 passengers or up to 12,000 lbs of cargo depending on configuration, or configured as bulk fuel hauler with up to 10,000 lbs of fuel per trip, medium-range mid-size Combi passenger/freight conversion
  • built by Hawker Siddeley Aviation Limited, London, England at Manchester Woodford Aerodrome (XXB/EGCD), Woodford, Greater Manchester, England
  • first flight on November 27, 1968
  • VQ-FBH, Fiji Airways (Fiji Airways Limited), Nausori Airport (SUV/NFNA), Nausori, Viti Levu, Fiji from 1968 to 1970
  • change of airline name and headquarters to Air Pacific (Air Pacific Limited), Nadi International Airport (NAN/NFFN), Nadi, Viti Levu, Fiji in 1970
  • re-registered as DQ-FBH from 1970 to 1979
  • ZK-MCJ, Rotorua, Mount Cook Airline (Mount Cook Group), Christchurch, New Zealand in 1979
  • Mount Cook Airline owned by Air New Zealand Limited after 1989
  • registration cancelled in 1996
  • imported in 1996
  • registered to Air North, Yukon’s Airline on August 29, 1996
  • active

[Nikon Coolpix L20 point-and-shoot 10 MP digital camera, Nikkor 38–136-mm f/3.1–6.7 lens]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, June 2011

1962 de Havilland Canada DHC-3 Turbo Otter, c/n 427, C-FODX




1962 de Havilland Canada DHC-3 Turbo Otter, c/n 427, C-FODX, Arctic Aerospace Inc., Sea Island, Richmond, B.C., Canada, based at South Terminal, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C.; powered by one 750-hp Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-34 turboprop engine with constant-speed three-blade Hartzell propeller; amphibious floats; pilot, ten passengers, STOL (short take-off and landing) utility transport; built by de Havilland Canada, Toronto, Ontario at Downsview, Ontario; built as DHC-3 Otter, CF-ODX, powered by one 600-hp Pratt & Whitney R-1340-S1H1-G Wasp supercharged nine-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engine with constant-speed three-blade Hamilton Standard Hydromatic propeller; CF-ODX, Ontario Lands & Forests, Province of Ontario on September 25, 1962, floats/skis; CF-ODX, “67”, Ministery of Natural Resources, Province of Ontario, Sault Ste Marie, Ontario cancelled on July 17, 1990; C-FODX, Waweig Lake Outfitters Ltd., Thunder Bay, Ontario on April 19, 1994, cancelled on June 15, 1995; C-FODX, Wilderness North Air Limited, Thunder Bay, Ontario on June 15, 1995, cancelled on August 8, 1995; N644JJ, Aircraft Investments LLC, Oshkosh, Wisconsin; N644JJ, Arctic Aerospace LLC, Pahrump, Nevada on April 28, 1997, cancelled on May 11, 2011; imported in 2011; owner registered since May 12, 2011.

Near the West Coast Air and the Lindair Services Ltd. hangars, South Terminal, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C. at 11:44 am, Friday, June 17, 2011.

[Nikon Coolpix L20, s/n 51002451, point-and-shoot digital camera]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, June 2011

Friday, June 24, 2011

1988 Conair Firecat, c/n 34, C-FJOH, “76”

video

1988 Conair Firecat, c/n 34, C-FJOH, “76”, Conair Group Inc., Abbotsford, B.C., Canada, operating as Conair Aviation, based at Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C.; powered by two 1,525-hp Wright R-1820-82WA Cyclone supercharged nine-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engines with constant-speed three-blade Hamilton Standard Hydromatic propellers; single-seat, airtanker/firefighter; retardant tank; rebuilt by Conair Aviation Ltd.; built as Grumman S2F-1 Tracker (Model G-89), c/n G-254, BuNo 133283 USN; crew of four (pilot, co-pilot, two detection systems operators), long-range deep-water ASW (anti-submarine warfare) surveillance and protection; built by The Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation, Bethpage, Long Island, New York, USA at Bethpage, Long Island, New York (F); converted to S2F-1T Tracker (multi-engine flight training and ASW training); redesignated as TS-2A Tracker in 1962; N424DF, California Department of Forestry, Mather, California; rebuilt as Conair Firecat; owner registered since September 24, 1991.

Preparing to depart for a fire at Seton Portage, B.C., situated between Pemberton and Lillooet. The 47th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C. at 10:39 am, Friday, August 7, 2009.

© Copyright video by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2009

1958 Conair Firecat, c/n 31, C-FEFX, “75”

video

1958 Conair Firecat, c/n 31, C-FEFX, “75”, Conair Group Inc., Abbotsford, B.C., Canada, operating as Conair Aviation, based at Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C.; powered by two 1,525-hp Wright R-1820-82WA Cyclone supercharged nine-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engines with constant-speed three-blade Hamilton Standard Hydromatic propellers; single-seat, airtanker/firefighter; retardant tank; converted by Conair Aviation Ltd.; built as Grumman S2F-1 Tracker (Model G-89), c/n G-527, BuNo 136618 USN; crew of four (pilot, co-pilot, two detection systems operators), long-range deep-water ASW (anti-submarine warfare) surveillance and protection; built by The Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation, Bethpage, Long Island, New York, USA at Bethpage, Long Island, New York (F); converted to S2F-1T Tracker (multi-engine flight training and ASW training); redesignated as TS-2A Tracker in 1962; N425DF, California Department of Forestry, Mather, California; converted to Conair Firecat; owner registered since October 11, 1991.

Preparing to depart for a fire at Seton Portage, B.C., situated between Pemberton and Lillooet. The 47th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C. at 10:32 am, Friday, August 7, 2009.

© Copyright video by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2009

1957 Conair Firecat, c/n 19, C-FOPY, “69”

video

1957 Conair Firecat, c/n 19, C-FOPY, “69”, Conair Group Inc., Abbotsford, B.C., Canada, operating as Conair Aviation, based at Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C.; powered by two 1,525-hp Wright R-1820-82WA Cyclone supercharged nine-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engines with constant-speed three-blade Hamilton Standard Hydromatic propellers; single-seat, airtanker/firefighter; retardant tank; converted by Conair Aviation Ltd.; built as Grumman CS2F-1 Tracker (Model G-103), c/n DHC24; crew of four (pilot, co-pilot, two detection systems operators), long-range deep-water ASW (anti-submarine warfare) surveillance and protection/with decommission of aircraft carrier HMCS Bonaventure, became shore-based and given role change, crew of three (pilot, co-pilot, Airborne Electronic Sensor Operator), shallow-water anti-shipping surveillance, northern sovereignty surveillance, fisheries protection and maritime patrol; built by de Havilland Canada, Toronto, Ontario at Downsview, Ontario; taken on strength as 1525 RCN in 1957; renumbered as 12125 CAF in June 1970; redesignated as CP-121 Tracker; not clear if CAF serial marked before being struck off; struck off strength on November 12, 1970; CF-IOF, later CF-OPY, “58”, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources from September 28, 1978; C-FOPY, converted to Conair Firecat by May 1985; registration as CS2F-1 Tracker cancelled on September 24, 1991; re-registered as Conair Firecat the same day.

1988 Conair Firecat, c/n 34, C-FJOH, “76”, Conair Group Inc., Abbotsford, B.C., Canada, operating as Conair Aviation, based at Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C.; powered by two 1,525-hp Wright R-1820-82WA Cyclone supercharged nine-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engines with constant-speed three-blade Hamilton Standard Hydromatic propellers.

1958 Conair Firecat, c/n 31, C-FEFX, “75”, Conair Group Inc., Abbotsford, B.C., Canada, operating as Conair Aviation, based at Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C.; powered by two 1,525-hp Wright R-1820-82WA Cyclone supercharged nine-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engines with constant-speed three-blade Hamilton Standard Hydromatic propellers.

Three Conair Firecats preparing for departure. In all, four of these vintage birds left one after the other between 10:30 and 10:44 am for a fire at Seton Portage, B.C., situated between Pemberton and Lillooet. The 47th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C. at 10:31 am, Friday, August 7, 2009.

© Copyright video by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2009

Thursday, June 23, 2011

Conair Firecats at their Abbotsford Air Tanker Base

video

1988 Conair Firecat, c/n 34, C-FJOH, “76”, Conair Group Inc., Abbotsford, B.C., Canada, operating as Conair Aviation, based at Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C.; powered by two 1,525-hp Wright R-1820-82WA Cyclone supercharged nine-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engines with constant-speed three-blade Hamilton Standard Hydromatic propellers; single-seat, airtanker/firefighter; retardant tank; rebuilt by Conair Aviation Ltd.; built as Grumman S2F-1 Tracker (Model G-89), c/n G-254, BuNo 133283 USN; crew of four (pilot, co-pilot, two detection systems operators), long-range deep-water ASW (anti-submarine warfare) surveillance and protection; built by The Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation, Bethpage, Long Island, New York, USA at Bethpage, Long Island, New York (F); converted to S2F-1T Tracker (multi-engine flight training and ASW training); redesignated as TS-2A Tracker in 1962; N424DF, California Department of Forestry, Mather, California; rebuilt as Conair Firecat; owner registered since September 24, 1991.

1957 Conair Firecat, c/n 19, C-FOPY, “69”, Conair Group Inc., Abbotsford, B.C., Canada, operating as Conair Aviation, based at Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C.; powered by two 1,525-hp Wright R-1820-82WA Cyclone supercharged nine-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engines with constant-speed three-blade Hamilton Standard Hydromatic propellers; single-seat, airtanker/firefighter; retardant tank; converted by Conair Aviation Ltd.; built as Grumman CS2F-1 Tracker (Model G-103), c/n DHC24; crew of four (pilot, co-pilot, two detection systems operators), long-range deep-water ASW (anti-submarine warfare) surveillance and protection/with decommission of aircraft carrier HMCS Bonaventure, became shore-based and given role change, crew of three (pilot, co-pilot, Airborne Electronic Sensor Operator), shallow-water anti-shipping surveillance, northern sovereignty surveillance, fisheries protection and maritime patrol; built by de Havilland Canada, Toronto, Ontario at Downsview, Ontario; taken on strength as 1525 RCN in 1957; renumbered as 12125 CAF in June 1970; redesignated as CP-121 Tracker; not clear if CAF serial marked before being struck off; struck off strength on November 12, 1970; CF-IOF, later CF-OPY, “58”, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources from September 28, 1978; C-FOPY, converted to Conair Firecat by May 1985; registration as CS2F-1 Tracker cancelled on September 24, 1991; re-registered as Conair Firecat the same day.

1958 Conair Firecat, c/n 31, C-FEFX, “75”, Conair Group Inc., Abbotsford, B.C., Canada, operating as Conair Aviation, based at Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C.; powered by two 1,525-hp Wright R-1820-82WA Cyclone supercharged nine-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engines with constant-speed three-blade Hamilton Standard Hydromatic propellers; single-seat, airtanker/firefighter; retardant tank; converted by Conair Aviation Ltd.; built as Grumman S2F-1 Tracker (Model G-89), c/n G-527, BuNo 136618 USN; crew of four (pilot, co-pilot, two detection systems operators), long-range deep-water ASW (anti-submarine warfare) surveillance and protection; built by The Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation, Bethpage, Long Island, New York, USA at Bethpage, Long Island, New York (F); converted to S2F-1T Tracker (multi-engine flight training and ASW training); redesignated as TS-2A Tracker in 1962; N425DF, California Department of Forestry, Mather, California; converted to Conair Firecat; owner registered since October 11, 1991.

Three Conair Firecats preparing for departure. In all, four of these vintage birds left one after the other between 10:30 and 10:44 am for a fire at Seton Portage, B.C., situated between Pemberton and Lillooet. The 47th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C. at 10:30 am, Friday, August 7, 2009.

© Copyright video by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2009

Thursday, June 16, 2011

1984 Gates Learjet C-21A (Model 35A), c/n 35A-546, BuNo 84-0100

1984 Gates Learjet C-21A (Model 35A), c/n 35A-546, BuNo 84-0100, “Happy Hooligans”, 119th WG (Wing), North Dakota ANG (Air National Guard), ACC (Air Combat Command)/AMC (Air Mobility Command), USAF, based at Hector International Airport (FAR), Fargo, North Dakota, USA; powered by two 3,500-lbf Garrett AiResearch TFE731-2-2B turbofan engines; crew of two (pilot and co-pilot), six to eight passengers, utility transport; built by Gates Learjet Corporation, Wichita, Kansas at Wichita, Kansas.

The 48th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C., Canada at 9:54 am, Saturday, August 14, 2010.

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2010

1941 Piper J-3C-65 Cub, c/n 6909, C-FELR

1941 Piper J-3C-65 Cub, c/n 6909, C-FELR, Charles Price, Sidney, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada; powered by one 65-hp Continental A65-8 four-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with fixed-pitch two-blade Sensenich propeller; tandem pilot and passenger, general aviation; built by Piper Aircraft Company, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania, USA; registered on March 26, 1979, cancelled on May 1, 1989; C-FELR, J. Furgale, Winnipeg, Manitoba/R. Larner, Winnipeg, Manitoba/T. Paul, Winnipeg, Manitoba on May 1, 1989, cancelled on November 16, 1993; C-FELR, Raymond Larner, Winnipeg, Manitoba/Bruce Bowles, Winnipeg, Manitoba/Timothy Paul, Winnipeg, Manitoba on November 16, 1993.

The Annual Duncan Fly-In, Duncan Airport (DUQ), Duncan, Vancouver Island, B.C. in summer 1979.

[Agfamatic 100 viewfinder camera, Agfa Agfacolor Special CNS 126 20 DIN/80 ASA 20-exposure colour negative cartridge film]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, 1979

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

1966 Piper PA-32-260 Cherokee Six, c/n 32-287, C-GXZO




1966 Piper PA-32-260 Cherokee Six, c/n 32-287, C-GXZO, Donald Halbert, Port Alberni, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada, based at Qualicum Beach Airport (CAT4), Qualicum Beach, Vancouver Island, B.C.; powered by one 260-hp Lycoming O-540-E4B5 six-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with constant-speed two-blade Hartzell propeller; pilot, five passengers, general aviation; built by Piper Aircraft, Vero Beach, Florida, USA at Vero Beach Municipal Airport; C-GXZO, Edward Brennan, North Saanich, Vancouver Island, B.C. on November 17, 1986, cancelled on December 17, 1993; owner registered since December 17, 1993.

The 48th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C. at 9:25 am, Saturday, August 14, 2010.

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2010

1946 Stinson 108-1 Voyager, c/n 108-1296, CF-EZB


1946 Stinson 108-1 Voyager, c/n 108-1296, CF-EZB, Mike and Darlene Davenport, Surrey, B.C., Canada, based at Langley Regional Airport (YNJ), Langley, B.C.; powered by one 165-hp Franklin 6A4-165-B3 six-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with fixed-pitch two-blade McCauley propeller; pilot, three passengers, general aviation; built by Stinson Aircraft Company, Detroit, Michigan, USA; CF-EZB, Dm Rankin, Richmond, B.C. cancelled on January 23, 1985; C-FEZB, Maxine Rankin, Richmond, B.C. cancelled on May 26, 1988; C-FEZB, Douglas Rankin, Richmond, B.C. cancelled on November 23, 1990; owner registered since November 13, 1992.

The 48th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C. at 9:05 am, Saturday, August 14, 2010.

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2010

2007 Schweizer 300CBi (269C-1), c/n 0322, C-FSEV

2007 Schweizer 300CBi (269C-1), c/n 0322, C-FSEV, British Columbia Helicopters Limited, Langley, B.C., Canada, based at Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C.; powered by one 180-hp Lycoming HIO-360-G1A fuel-injected four-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with three-blade main rotor and two-blade tail rotor; side-by-side instructor and student, light utility/trainer; built by Schweizer Aircraft Corporation, Horseheads, New York, USA at Elmira, New York; N86G, Schweizer Aircraft Corporation; imported in 2007; owner registered since December 18, 2007.

The 48th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C. at 9:27 am, Saturday, August 14, 2010.

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2010

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

1968 Cessna 177 Cardinal, c/n 177-00336, C-GHZW

1968 Cessna 177 Cardinal, c/n 177-00336, C-GHZW, R.C. Jackson, Surrey, B.C., Canada, based at Boundary Bay Airport (YDT), Delta, B.C.; powered by one 150-hp Lycoming O-320-E2D four-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with fixed-pitch two-blade McCauley propeller; pilot, three passengers, general aviation; built by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, Kansas, USA; C-GHZW, Joseph Mondok, Nanaimo, Vancouver Island, B.C. on June 15, 1977, cancelled on March 20, 2006; owner registered since March 21, 2006.

The 48th Annual Abbotsford International Airport, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C. at 9:18 am, Saturday, August 14, 2010.

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2010

1966 Alon A-2 Aircoupe, c/n A-168, C-GJNW

1966 Alon A-2 Aircoupe, c/n A-168, C-GJNW, Allen Whalley, Victoria, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada, based at Victoria International Airport (YYJ), Sidney, Vancouver Island, B.C.; powered by one 90-hp Continental C90-16F four-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with fixed-pitch two-blade McCauley propeller; side-by-side pilot and passenger, general aviation; built by Alon Inc., McPherson, Kansas, USA; N966JL, Judy A. Longenecker, Elkhart, Indiana on February 12, 1990, cancelled on May 30, 2001; imported in 2001; owner registered since June 22, 2001.

The 48th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C. at 1:57 pm, Saturday, August 14, 2010.

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2010

Monday, June 13, 2011

2010 Cessna 510 Citation Mustang, c/n 510-0320, N510HS, Cessna Aircraft Company




2010 Cessna 510 Citation Mustang, c/n 510-0320, N510HS, Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, Kansas, USA; powered by two 1,460-lbf Pratt & Whitney Canada PW615F-A high-bypass turbofan engines; crew of two (pilot and co-pilot), five passengers, VLJ (Very Light Jet) business aviation; built by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, Kansas at Independence, Kansas; N9160T, Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, Kansas on May 27, 2010; airworthiness issued on July 22, 2010; certificate issued on July 26, 2010.

The 48th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C. at about 1:23 pm, Saturday, August 14, 2010.

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2010

1974 Rockwell 690A Turbo Commander, c/n 11166, C-GRRO

1974 Rockwell 690A Turbo Commander, c/n 11166, C-GRRO, Orr Air Inc., Vancouver, B.C., Canada, based at South Terminal, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C.; powered by two 575-hp Garrett AiResearch TPE331-5-251K turboprop engines with constant-speed three-blade Hartzell propellers; retractable landing gear; crew of two (pilot and co-pilot), eleven passengers, utility transport; built by Rockwell International, USA; N77HS, Harrison Steel Castings Co., Attica, New York on January 3, 1986; airworthiness reissued on November 19, 1994; N78BA, SSG Equipment Leasing LLC, Winston Salem, North Carolina on September 11, 2002, cancelled on May 15, 2006; imported in 2006; owner registered since October 5, 2006.

The 48th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C. on Saturday, August 14, 2010 at 9:31 am.

[1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filter; Fujifilm Fujicolor Pro 160S 36-exposure colour negative film]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2010

Saturday, June 11, 2011

1972 Bell 206B JetRanger II, c/n 763, CF-ALF, Alpine Helicopters


1972 Bell 206B JetRanger II, c/n 763, CF-ALF, Alpine Helicopters Ltd., Kelowna, B.C., Canada, based at Kelowna, B.C.; powered by one 400-shp Allison 250-C20 turboshaft engine with two-blade main rotor and two-blade tail rotor; skids; pilot, four-passengers or equivalent cargo, multi-purpose utility transport; built by Bell Helicopter Company, Textron Inc., Hurst, Texas, USA; owner registered since March 28, 1972; re-registered as C-FALF; registration cancelled on July 25, 1996.

The Annual Duncan Flying Club Fly-In, Duncan Airport (DUQ), Duncan, Vancouver Island, B.C. on Sunday, June 10, 1979.

[Agfa Agfamatic 100 sensor viewfinder 126 cartridge film camera, 42.1-mm f/11 lens; Agfa Agfacolor Special CNS 126 20 DIN/80 ASA 20-exposure colour negative cartridge film]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, June 1979

1978 Piper PA-31-325 Navajo C/R, c/n 31-7812085, C-GDFR

1978 Piper PA-31-325 Navajo C/R, c/n 31-7812085, C-GDFR, Island Express Air Inc., Abbotsford, B.C., Canada, based at Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C.; powered by one each 325-hp Lycoming TIO-540-F2BD/LTIO-540-F2BD turbocharged fuel-injected six-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with counter-rotating, constant-speed three-blade Hartzell propellers; retractable landing gear; pilot, nine passengers, utility transport; built by Piper Aircraft, Vero Beach, Florida, USA at Lock Haven, Pennsylvania; N51DW, Desert Aviation Services Inc., Las Vegas, Nevada certificate issued on April 16, 1997, cancelled on April 6, 1998; imported in 1998; C-GDFR, Dynamic Flight Services Inc., Calgary, Alberta on April 14, 1998, cancelled on November 16, 2007; C-GDFR, BCWest Air Inc., Abbotsford, B.C. on November 26, 2007, cancelled on June 19, 2008; C-GDFR, BCWEST Air Inc., Nanaimo, Vancouver Island, B.C. on June 27, 2008, cancelled on December 12, 2008; C-GDFR, Island Express Air Inc., Lantzville, Vancouver Island, B.C. on May 22, 2009, cancelled on August 20, 2009; owner re-registered since August 20, 2009.

The 48th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C. on Saturday, August 14, 2010 at 9:35 am.

[1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filter; Fujifilm Fujicolor Pro 160S 36-exposure colour negative film]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2010

Friday, June 10, 2011

Royal Canadian Air Cadets, 1975–1979

The sole surviving shoulder patch from my “battle dress”-style (short waist coat) blue-grey wool uniform, the 1941–1976 issue. Officially the colour was known as Azure Blue.

The “battle dress”-style blue-grey wool uniform was changed to a CAF rifle green safari-style uniform. The style and weight were more suited to the indoors of the cadet halls and the summer training climate and temperatures. The first of these were issued to squadrons starting in 1978. Although the old blue-grey wool uniforms were hot in the summer, but warm in the winter, I did not like the change from the traditional WW II-era RCAF style to one that made the male cadets look like little wussies and sissies, and it was not flattering to the females either. The current blue Air Cadet uniform is a great improvement on the green style and a big step in the right direction. Our head gear was the “Wedge Cap”, or “Wedgie” as we named them, worn with a slight tilt to the right side, one inch above the right ear, and centred forward and aft on the head, the front one inch above the eye brow. It was designed with pull-down ear flaps and neck protection, useful in the cold Canadian winters on windy and icy parade squares.

About one month before my thirteenth birthday, I joined the local RCAirC (Royal Canadian Air Cadets) unit, 744 Cowichan Squadron, enlisting for four years, sometime September 1975 to the early autumn of 1979 just after the start of Grade 11, with the aim of receiving and achieving flight training through their glider and small aircraft familiarization programs. My parents were not too thrilled about the uniform and the military aspects of this, as father had experienced mandatory enlistment in the Hitler Jugend (Hitler Youth) during the wartime Nazi years, from age 12 in March 1941 to the end of hostilities in early May 1945, but nonetheless allowed me, and a year later my brother, to enlist.

Since childhood I wanted to pursue my dream of becoming either a bushplane or a commercial pilot. Flying was it. I did not care much for the military discipline, although I always followed commands. But I only attained the rank of Corporal.

In those years the squadron was based in the old St. Ann Rectory, a former Catholic convent and girls residence school for many Cowichan natives for 100 years, built by the Sisters of St. Ann in 1864, next to the Stinesen’s farm and the little white St. Ann’s Church, Quamichan, 1775 Tzouhalem Rd., almost at the foot of and in the shadows of Mt. Tzouhalem and its white cross overlooking Cowichan Bay. My Blackfoot First Nations uncle, John McHugh, (Siksika Nation in Gleichen, Alberta) is buried at St. Ann’s Church. He took his own life with a hand gun in the early 1970s. He had experienced the horrors of a residential school. Today St. Ann Rectory is known as Providence Farm (where for a time, or maybe still, the annual Island Music Festival annually takes place).

A girl I knew and liked since Grade One, Jennifer Brain (now Lally), joined during my last year of enlistment. A few other cadets I remember are a Stinesen daughter, Simone Desautels and her brother, Peter Norie, Fiona Barr and her brother, Greg Anderson, Sabina Braun, Richard Leduc, Ken Dzuba, and Stuart Lumgair.

Nanaimo Airport (YCD), Cassidy (near Nanaimo), Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada was where the weekend familiarization flights took place on a few weekends in late spring, summer, and autumn, typically from late March to early November, weather-permitting. This included flying as a passenger in the rear seat of the tandem two-seat Cessna L-19A-CE Bird Dog or Bellanca 8GCBC Scout tow plane and in the front seat of one of the tandem two-seat Schweizer SGU 2-22C, Schweizer SGU 2-22E, or Schweizer SGS 2-33A gliders, participation in the ground operations which included positioning the gliders for take-off and retrieving them after landing, signalling between the tow plane and the glider, holding up and running with the right wing tip until the glider picked up sufficient take-off speed, and retrieving tow ropes dropped by the tow plane prior to it landing, from the grass strip between Runway 16/34 and the parallel tarmac, hooking the tow rope to the tow plane and the glider, and lollipop duty, holding up a big round orange day-glo aluminum sign to stop taxiing aircraft until the tow plane or the glider had passed and landed, at the edge of Taxiway Able, Runway 34, or Taxiway Bravo, Runway 16, depending on the wind direction indicated by the orange wind sock situated on the grass strip. On one occasion I was in the enviable position of stopping a just-arrived Douglas DC-3 from entering the taxiway and crossing the incoming glider’s landing path. I can still see the pilot and co-pilot looking down at me, and the passengers peering from the cabin windows. The Air Cadet League provided administrative and recreational support at these events. This reduced the workload of the CAF flying and training staff and the Air Cadet squadron commanders. 

I attended two or three extended field trips to NAS (Naval Air Station) Whidbey Island, near Oak Harbor, Washington, USA including a tour of the Boeing 747 factory at Paine Field (PAE), Everett, Washington. There was also an excursion to the South Terminal at Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C. which included a tour of some hangars and clambering inside the sickly green Grumman G-73 Mallard amphibious flying boat, CF-HUB, or was it the Grumman G-73 Mallard, CF-HPU ?, seemingly a little lost and forlorn, parked out on the weed-plagued tarmac.

In the summer of 1978, I attended the Basic Training camp at CFB Penhold near Red Deer, Alberta. We flew Victoria–Vancouver–Edmonton with a Pacific Western Airlines Boeing 737-275 and then bumped our way to the base, on hard, vinyl benches in a dark green Canadian Armed Forces Bluebird bus. I neglected to use an airport washroom when an officer gave us the opportunity, thinking I was not in need until the base. I sat suffering in silence and anguish with a full bladder and urine erection, luckily on a last row bench at a window, covering up with my blue grey wool jacket. We were underway for a little over two hours.

I remember flying with the 1975 Boeing 737-275(A), c/n 20959/395, C-GCPW, “741”, PWA, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; powered by two 14,500-lbs thrust Pratt & Whitney JT8D-9A(HK3) low-bypass turbofan engines; crew of two (pilot and co-pilot), seating configuration Y117 (economy-class), short- to medium-range, narrow-body airliner; built by The Boeing Company, Seattle, Washington, USA at Renton, Washington; first flight on January 22, 1975; delivered on February 24, 1975; N126AW, “126”, America West Airlines, Phoenix, Arizona on June 20, 1983; C-GCPW, Canadian Airlines International, Calgary, Alberta on November 12, 1987; C-GCPW, America West Airlines, Phoenix, Arizona on May 10, 1989, leased; C-GCPW, Canadian Airlines International, Calgary, Alberta on January 6, 1998; C-GCPW, “541”, Air Canada, Montréal, Québec on March 8, 2001, merged; full Air Canada colour scheme; last regular flight in October 2001; ferried from Calgary International Airport (YYC), Calgary, Alberta to Opa-locka Airport (OPF), Miami-Dade County, Florida on April 10, 2003; broken up by BlueSide Metals at Opa-locka Airport (OPF), Miami-Dade County, Florida; scrapped.

My summer training highlight was flying in a de Havilland Canada CC-138 Twin Otter through a series of loops and hammerhead stalls high over the Alberta prairie, the blue skies sparsely battened with a few high-altitude puffs of straggling cloud. With the G forces through the manoeuvres our wedgies floated from our heads to slide a moment along the cabin ceiling.

As best as I can recall, it was the 1971 de Havilland Canada CC-138 Twin Otter (military version of -300 Series), c/n 309, 13807/807, CAF; powered by two 680-shp Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-27 turboprop engines with constant-speed, full-feathering reversible-pitch, three-blade Hartzell propellers; crew of two (pilot and co-pilot), 18 passengers, STOL (short take-off and landing) SAR (search and rescue)/Arctic utility transport; built by de Havilland Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Canada at Downsview, Ontario; taken on strength on September 17, 1971; No. 440 Squadron, CFB Namao, Edmonton, Alberta; struck off on May 5, 1987; she was used by crew from reserve unit No. 418 Squadron at time of the crash on June 14, 1986, searching for a civilian SAR aircraft that had gone down looking for an overdue light plane; the aircraft was destroyed flying into the side of a mountain, killing all on board: pilot Captain Ted Kates, co-pilot Captain Wayne Plumtree, and six observers; according to the official accident report, the crash was caused by a freak optical illusion; the colour of the rocks in the mountain combined with the sun angle at the time of the crash made a large ledge impossible to see; the crash location is 74 kilometres (46.3 miles) west of Calgary, Alberta.

I was a day dreamer, having difficulty focusing on math and theory knowledge and the skills necessary to be able to learn all the technical stuff. I could not grasp the navigation calculation formulas. I scored poor marks on the mathematical and navigational problems and questions of the flying ground school lessons and exam. I failed the exams as a prerequisite for applying to glider school training and beyond.

At about the same time I did not pass the exacting medical physicals. I notoriously fainted during the doctor appointments and anytime there was any talk of medical-related subjects and issues.

I quit Air Cadets a week after washing out, my long-held dreams of flying dashed. I was in a blue funk.

In time I applied my focus in a new direction. Camphill was to be just over the horizon.

© Copyright scanned image by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, June 2011

1974 Bellanca 7KCAB Citabria “B”, c/n 422-74, C-GSIK

1974 Bellanca 7KCAB Citabria “B”, c/n 422-74, C-GSIK, Barbara and Glen Fetterly, Chilliwack, B.C., Canada, based at Chilliwack Airport (YCW), Chilliwack, B.C.; powered by one 150-hp Lycoming IO-320-E2B fuel-injected four-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with fixed-pitch two-blade Sensenich propeller; tandem pilot and passenger, STOL (short take-off and landing) general aviation; built by Bellanca Aircraft Corporation, Plainview, Texas, USA at Osceola, Wisconsin; C-GSIK, Moncton Flying Club, Moncton, N.B. cancelled on December 19, 1985; C-GSIK, Brendon Nunes, Pickering, Ontario cancelled on July 17, 1986; C-GSIK, George Kashul, Lindsay, Ontario on July 15, 1987, cancelled on November 2, 2007; C-GSIK, 564835 Ontario Limited, Lindsay, Ontario on November 5, 2007, cancelled on May 7, 2008; owner registered since May 7, 2008.

The 48th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C. on Saturday, August 14, 2010 at 9:39 am.

[1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filter; Fujifilm Fujicolor Pro 160S 36-exposure colour negative film]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2010

1953 Cessna 170B, c/n 26048, CF-IKC


1953 Cessna 170B, c/n 26048, CF-IKC, Willem Peetoom, Abbotsford, B.C., Canada, based at Pitt Meadows Regional Airport (YPK), Pitt Meadows, B.C.; powered by one 180-hp Lycoming O-360-A1A four-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with fixed-pitch two-blade McCauley propeller; pilot, three passengers, general aviation; built by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, Kansas, USA; C-FIKC, Joseph McSween, Nanoose Bay, Vancouver Island, B.C. cancelled on August 11, 1982; C-FIKC, George Barden, Courtenay, Vancouver Island, B.C. cancelled on August 30, 1985; owner registered since June 11, 1986.

The 48th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C. on Saturday, August 14, 2010 at 9:40 am.

[1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filter; Fujifilm Fujicolor Pro 160S 36-exposure colour negative film]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2010

Thursday, June 9, 2011

1960 Cessna 172A, c/n 47155, C-FLZW



1960 Cessna 172A, c/n 47155, C-FLZW, Peter Chick, Sardis, B.C., Canada/Robert Hislop, Hope, B.C./Reg Hunchuk, Hope, B.C./Monte Phillips, Hope, B.C., based at Hope Aerodrome (YHE), Hope, B.C.; powered by one 145-hp Continental O-300-A six-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with fixed-pitch two-blade McCauley propeller; pilot, three passengers, general aviation; built by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, Kansas, USA; CF-LZW, Sunshine Aviation Sales, Pitt Meadows, B.C. cancelled on June 10, 1983; C-FLZW, George Underhill, Pemberton, B.C. on August 1, 1986, cancelled on August 21, 1991; C-FLZW, Desmond Coen, Vancouver, B.C. on June 30, 1993, cancelled on February 22, 2002; C-FLZW, Peter Chick, Sardis, B.C. on February 22, 2002, cancelled on May 10, 2007; owners registered since May 10, 2007.

Hope Aerodrome (YHE), Hope, B.C. on Tuesday, August 4, 2009 at 12:35 pm.

[Casio Exilim EX-Z20 point-and-shoot 8.1 MP digital camera, 38–114-mm f/3.1–5.9 lens]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2009

1970 Bell 206B JetRanger II, c/n 194, C-GVTM

1969 Bell 206B JetRanger II, c/n 194, C-GVTM, Far West Helicopters Ltd., Chilliwack, B.C., Canada, based at Chilliwack Airport (YCW), Chilliwack, B.C.; powered by one 400-shp Allison 250-C20 turboshaft engine with two-blade main rotor and two-blade tail rotor; skids; pilot, four passengers or equivalent cargo, multi-purpose utility transport; built by Bell Helicopter Company, Textron Inc., Hurst, Texas, USA; built as 206A JetRanger, powered by one 317-shp Allison 250-C18 turboshaft engine with two-blade main rotor and two-blade tail rotor; converted to 206B JetRanger II with upgrade kit in 1970; N4038G, Tundra Copters Inc., Fairbanks, Alaska on May 8, 1975, cancelled on March 14, 1979; imported in 1979; C-GVTM, Rotortech Helicopters, Surrey, B.C. cancelled on April 23, 1986; C-GVTM, Capital Helicopters Inc., Delta, B.C. cancelled on March 14, 1988; C-GVTM, Sandspit Heli-Jet Ltd., Sandspit, Haida Gwaii, B.C. on April 25, 1988, cancelled on June 8, 1990; C-GVTM, Cariboo Chilcotin Helicopters, Lillooet, B.C. on June 8, 1990, cancelled on June 18, 1991; C-GVTM, Pacific Rim Helicopters Ltd., Delta, B.C. on September 22, 1993, cancelled on May 6, 1994; C-GVTM, Alpen Helicopters Ltd., Langley, B.C. on May 6, 1994, cancelled on September 19, 1996; owner registered since September 19, 1996.

Hope Aerodrome (YHE), Hope, B.C. on Tuesday, August 4, 2009 at 12:34 pm.

[Casio Exilim EX-Z20 point-and-shoot 8.1 MP digital camera, 38–114-mm f/3.1–5.9 lens]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2009

Wednesday, June 8, 2011

1986 Raytheon Beechcraft 1900C, c/n UB-66, C-FPCX

1986 Raytheon Beechcraft 1900C, c/n UB-66, C-FPCX, Pacific Coastal Airlines Ltd. (Jim Pattison’s airline), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C., Canada, based at South Terminal, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C.; powered by two 1,100-shp Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-65B turboprop engines with constant-speed four-blade Hartzell propellers; crew of two (pilot and co-pilot), 19 passengers, regional airliner; built by Raytheon Company, Lexington, Massachusetts, USA at Wichita, Kansas; N3044C; N823BE, BEX Business Express, Portsmouth, New Hampshire on December 30, 1986; N823BE, GECC in June 1996, returned; F-OJAS, Aero Services, France on May 20, 1997; F-GTOT, Regourd Aviation, France in June 1997, leased; F-GTOT, Darta Aero Charter, France in June 1997, leased; F-GTOT, Danish Air Transport in December 1997, leased; OY-JRF, Danish Air Transport, Denmark on April 21, 1998; imported in 2006; owner registered since June 20, 2006.

Engineless and partially dismantled, South Terminal, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C. on Tuesday, December 21, 2010 at 11:22 am.

[1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filter; Kodak Gold 200 36-exposure colour negative film]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, December 2010

1962 Cessna 210B Centurion, c/n 210-57968, C-FGPI

1962 Cessna 210B Centurion, c/n 210-57968, C-FGPI, Wallace Elkins, Pemberton, B.C., Canada, based at Pemberton Airport (YPS), Pemberton, B.C.; powered by one 260-hp Continental IO-470-S fuel-injected six-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with constant-speed three-blade McCauley propeller; retractable landing gear; pilot, five passengers, general aviation; built by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, Kansas, USA; airworthiness issued on March 30, 1962; N9668X, Jacob Kropf, Halsey, Oregon certificate issued on December 18, 1995, cancelled on June 20, 2002; imported in 2002; C-FGPI, Green Prairie International Inc., Lethbridge, Alberta on June 26, 2002, cancelled on December 28, 2005; owner registered since January 16, 2006.

The 48th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C. on Saturday, August 14, 2010 at 9:35 am.

[1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filterFujifilm Fujicolor Pro 160S 36-exposure colour negative film]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2010