1944 Grumman G-21A Goose, c/n B-101, CF-VFU, FIFT. Dockside somewhere up Knight Inlet, B.C., Canada in spring 1969.

[1959 Kodak Retina IIIS (Type 027) rangefinder 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 86125, with Schneider-Kreuznach Retina-Xenon 50-mm f/1.9 Synchro Compur lens, s/n 6841319; Kodak Plus-X Pan (ISO 125/22°) 36-exposure black & white negative film]


© Copyright photograph by Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg, 1969 / Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, March 2011





“The whole history of the Canadian North can be divided into two periods—before and after the aeroplane.”
Hugh L. Keenleyside, Deputy Canadian Minister of Mines and Resources, October 1949




Monday, November 7, 2011

1961 Douglas DC-8-43, c/n 45622/137, CF-CPI, “604”, Empress of Amsterdam, Canadian Pacific Air Lines

1961 Douglas DC-8-43, c/n 45622/137, CF-CPI, “604”, Empress of Amsterdam, Canadian Pacific Air Lines, Sea Island, Richmond, B.C., Canada; powered by four 17,625-lbs thrust Rolls-Royce RCo.12 Conway Mk. 509 low-bypass turbofan engines; crew of three (pilot, co-pilot, flight engineer), seven flight attendants, seating configuration 132 passengers (dual F/Y class cabin), intercontinental narrow-body airliner; built by Douglas Aircraft Company, Long Beach, California, USA; completed on April 26, 1961; delivered to Canadian Pacific Air Lines on May 20, 1961; named Empress of Calgary in May 1961; renamed Empress of Amsterdam in 1968; transferred to CP Air on April 1, 1969; re-registered as C-FCPI on January 1, 1974; sold to F.B. Ayer & Associates Inc., New York, New York, USA on November 16, 1980; the Empress of Amsterdam spent 19 years with Canadian Pacific Air Lines/CP Air before being stored, to Miami-Dade Fire Rescue Department in December 1982, and scrapped at Opa-locka Airport (OPF), Miami-Dade County, Florida, USA in 1988.

Felix Hayo Scharnberg and Stephan Alexander Scharnberg moments before boarding Flight 382, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C., Canada on Tuesday, July 23, 1968. 

This was still the old terminal, what is now the South Terminal with most of the original building still existing, albeit minus the control tower and the outside observation deck. I recall looking into the distance across the tarmac to the new terminal being built to the north, nearing completion. It was sunny with some high clouds.

We had two stops en route, served with refreshments to Calgary, Alberta, Canada, then Edmonton, Alberta, followed by dinner and breakfast, arriving at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol (Luchthaven Schiphol) (AMS), Haarlemmermeer, Netherlands the following morning. We rented a baby blue Renault 16 in Amsterdam and drove through the Netherlands, West Germany, and Switzerland, visiting friends and relatives. I have no record of which DC-8 we returned on, but it was Flight 381, departing Amsterdam-Schiphol on Tuesday, September 3, 1968. We had two stops en route, served with lunch and dinner to Edmonton, then Calgary, followed by refreshments to Vancouver.

1944 Grumman G-21A Goose, c/n B-83, CF-HUZ, Dryad II, West Coast Transmission Ltd., Vancouver, B.C., Canada; powered by two 450-hp Pratt & Whitney R-985-AN-14B Wasp Junior supercharged nine-cylinder, single-row, air-cooled radial piston engines with constant-speed three-blade Hartzell propellers; amphibious flying boat hull; crew of two (pilot and co-pilot), eight passengers, commercial transport; built by The Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation, Bethpage, Long Island, New York, USA at Plant 2, Bethpage, Long Island, New York (F); built as JRF-5 Goose (Model G-38), powered by two 450-hp Pratt & Whitney R-985-AN-6 Wasp Junior supercharged nine-cylinder, single-row, air-cooled radial piston engines with constant-speed two-blade Hamilton Standard propellers; delivered as BuNo 37830 to US Navy in September 1944; transferred to RCAF; taken on strength as Goose Mk. II, “393” on October 2, 1944; No. 9 Transport Group, RCAF, RCAF Station Rockcliffe, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada from 1946, became Air Transport Command on April 1, 1948 which relocated to RCAF Station Lachine, near Lachine and Dorval, Québec, Canada on August 9, 1951; struck off strength on February 14, 1956; converted to G-21A Goose; CF-HUZ, BNP Airways Ltd. (consortium of B.C. Electric/Northern Construction/Powell River Company Ltd./MacMillan Bloedel Ltd.), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C., Canada, based at Hangar #1 (located at what is now South Terminal), Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C., on February 14, 1956; engines upgraded, fitted with retractable floats; CF-HUZ, Dryad II, MacMillan Bloedel Ltd., Sea Island, Richmond, B.C., Canada, based at Hangar #1, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C., in 1966; CF-HUZ, Dryad II, West Coast Transmission Ltd., Vancouver, B.C., Canada from 1967 to 1977; C-FHUZ, Dryad II, MacMillan Bloedel Ltd., Sea Island, Richmond, B.C., Canada, based at South Terminal, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C., on January 22, 1980, cancelled on November 8, 1994; C-FHUZ, Pacific Coastal Airlines (Pacific Coastal Airlines Ltd.), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C., Canada, based at Port Hardy Airport (YZT), Port Hardy, Vancouver Island, B.C., on November 8, 1994; active.

CF-HUZ appears to be taxiing as her propellers are spinning.

[1959 Kodak Retina IIIS (Type 027) rangefinder 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 86125, with Schneider-Kreuznach Retina-Xenon 50-mm f/1.9 Synchro Compur lens, s/n 6841319]

© Copyright photograph by Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg, July 1968 / Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, March 2011

Monday, October 31, 2011

Royal Canadian Air Cadets weekend familiarization flights

(?) 1974 Bellanca 8GCBC Scout, c/n 291-74, C-GJXC, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada; powered by one 180-hp Lycoming O-360-C2E four-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with fixed-pitch two-blade McCauley propeller; tandem pilot and passenger, STOL (short take-off and landing) glider tow plane; built by Bellanca Aircraft Corporation, Plainview, Texas, USA at Osceola, Wisconsin; first registered to Air Cadet League of Canada on June 16, 1977; sold in 1984; C-GJXC, D. Fritzke, CFB Comox (YQQ), Comox, Vancouver Island, B.C. from 1989 to 1993; C-GJXC, G. Senkowski, Courtenay, Vancouver Island, B.C. from 1993 to 1995.

Schweizer SGS 2-33A, construction number and registration unknown.

Spring 1978.

When not the passenger in the tow plane or in a glider, we air cadets assisted in the ground operations which included positioning the gliders for take-off and retrieving them after landing, signalling between the tow plane and the glider, holding up and running with the right wing tip until the glider picked up sufficient take-off speed, and retrieving tow ropes dropped by the tow plane prior to it landing, from the grass strip between Runway 16/34 and the parallel tarmac, hooking the tow rope to the tow plane and the glider, and lollipop duty, holding up a big round orange day-glo aluminum sign to stop taxiing aircraft until the tow plane or the glider had passed and landed, at the edge of Taxiway Able, Runway 34, or Taxiway Bravo, Runway 16, depending on the wind direction indicated by the orange wind sock situated on the grass strip. 

Possible gliders and tow planes used for familiarization flights by the air cadets of 744 Cowichan Squadron, RCAirC (Royal Canadian Air Cadets) on a few weekends in late spring, summer, and autumn, typically from late March to early November, weather-permitting, at Nanaimo Airport (YCD), Cassidy (near Nanaimo), Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada, were:

1966 Schweizer SGU 2-22E (Model 22), c/n 236, CF-ACC, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada; tandem student and instructor, training sailplane; built by Schweizer Aircraft Corporation, Elmira, New York, USA; imported in 1967; C-FACC, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada, re-registered, cancelled on June 18, 1982; C-FACC, Stephen Paton, White Rock, B.C. on January 27, 1983, cancelled on February 4, 1998; exported to USA; N371MS, Wells Air Service Inc., Scotia, Nebraska on January 13, 1999; airworthiness issued on May 14, 1999.

1973 Schweizer SGS 2-33A (Model 33), c/n 268, CF-ACT, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada; tandem student and instructor, training sailplane; built by Schweizer Aircraft Corporation, Elmira, New York, USA; imported in 1973; CF-ACT, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada circa 1973, cancelled prior to 1982; off Canadian civil register by 1982.

1959 Schweizer SGU 2-22C (Model 22), c/n 79, CF-LYY, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada; tandem student and instructor, training sailplane; built by Schweizer Aircraft Corporation, Elmira, New York, USA; imported in 1959; CF-LYY, Air Cadet League of Canada in 1976 or earlier; CF-LYY, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada by 1976, cancelled on March 8, 1985; C-FLYY, Randall Blackwell, Cold Lake, Alberta on January 22, 1987, based at Medley, Alberta.

1975 Schweizer SGS 2-33A (Model 33), c/n 373, C-GCLK, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada; tandem student and instructor, training sailplane; built by Schweizer Aircraft Corporation, Elmira, New York, USA; imported in 1975; C-GCLK, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada on May 29, 1975; currently based at CFB Comox (YQQ), Comox, Vancouver Island, B.C.

1975 Schweizer SGS 2-33A (Model 33), c/n 374, C-GCLL, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada; tandem student and instructor, training sailplane; built by Schweizer Aircraft Corporation, Elmira, New York, USA; imported in 1975; C-GCLL, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada on May 29, 1975; currently based at CFB Comox (YQQ), Comox, Vancouver Island, B.C.

1976 Schweizer SGS 2-33A (Model 33), c/n 422, C-GCLU, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada; tandem student and instructor, training sailplane; built by Schweizer Aircraft Corporation, Elmira, New York, USA; imported in 1976; C-GCLU, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada on April 7, 1976, cancelled on February 27, 1990; deleted from Canadian civil register.

1976 Schweizer SGS 2-33A (Model 33), c/n 437, C-GCLW, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada; tandem student and instructor, training sailplane; built by Schweizer Aircraft Corporation, Elmira, New York, USA; imported in 1976; C-GCLW, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada circa 1976, cancelled on May 22, 1986; C-GCLW, Saskatchewan Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada, Regina, Saskatchewan on March 18, 1987, based at CFB Moose Jaw (YMJ), Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan; C-GCLW, Region Gliding School (Prairie), Saskatchewan Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada on January 5, 2004, based at Gimli Industrial Park Airport (YGM), Gimli, Manitoba.

1976 Schweizer SGS 2-33A (Model 33), c/n 452, C-GCLY, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada; tandem student and instructor, training sailplane; built by Schweizer Aircraft Corporation, Elmira, New York, USA; imported in 1976; C-GCLY, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada circa 1976, cancelled on June 28, 1982; C-GCLY, Nilson Aircraft Ltd. (aircraft broker), Campbell River, Vancouver Island, B.C. cancelled on August 19, 1987; C-GCLY, Heinz Portmann, Campbell River, Vancouver Island, B.C. on July 29, 1987, cancelled on March 9, 1989; C-GCLY, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada, Vancouver, B.C. on July 7, 1989, based at CFB Comox (YQQ), Comox, Vancouver Island, B.C.

1977 Schweizer SGS 2-33A (Model 33), c/n 482, C-GFMB, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada; tandem student and instructor, training sailplane; built by Schweizer Aircraft Corporation, Elmira, New York, USA; imported in 1977; C-GFMB, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada on June 28, 1977; currently based at CFB Comox (YQQ), Comox, Vancouver Island, B.C.

1954 Cessna L-19A-CE Bird Dog (Model 305A), c/n 23472, CF-TGA, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada; powered by one 213-hp Continental O-470-11 six-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with fixed-pitch two-blade McCauley propeller; tandem pilot and passenger, tow plane for Schweizer SGU 2-22 and Schweizer SGS 2-33 gliders; high-lift slotted wing flaps; built by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, Kansas at Wallace Plant, Wichita, Kansas (CE); BuNo 53-8051, US Army; taken on strength as 16702/702, RCAF on October 6, 1954, received in natural metal finish; No. 6 Repair Depot, RCAF Station Trenton, Trenton, Ontario for camouflage painting on October 6, 1954; No. 1 AOP (Air Observation Post) Flight, Camp Petawawa, Petawawa, Ontario on November 19, 1954; Central Experimental and Proving Establishment, RCAF Station Namao, Edmonton, Alberta on July 24, 1957 for cold weather trials; Headquarters Practice Flight, RCAF Station Rockcliffe, Ottawa, Ontario on March 21, 1958; back to No. 1 AOP (Air Observation Post) Flight, Camp Petawawa, Petawawa, Ontario on November 14, 1958; free issue to Canadian Army on May 4, 1961; RCAF Station Lincoln Park, Calgary, Alberta for Category B crash repairs on April 5, 1962; Army Aviation Tactical Training School, Rivers Camp, Rivers, Manitoba on January 2, 1963; Bristol Aerospace, Winnipeg, Manitoba for modifications on February 19, 1964; 3rd Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, Camp Shilo, Shilo, Manitoba on April 27, 1965; No. 4 Flight Training School, CFB Rivers, Rivers, Manitoba on May 7, 1968; 3 RCHA, Camp Shilo, Shilo, Manitoba on February 20, 1969, and then to 4 RCHA, CFB Petawawa, Petawawa, Ontario on same day; 5e Régiment d’artillerie légére du Canada, CFB Valcartier, Saint-Gabriel-de-Valcartier, Québec on April 25, 1969; last date as 16702/702 on June 11, 1970; became 119702/702, CAF; redesignated as CO-119 Bird Dog; first date on June 11, 1970, new serial number issued; with 5e Régiment d’artillerie légère du Canada, CFB Valcartier, Saint-Gabriel-de-Valcartier, Québec when renumbered; this unit absorbed by No. 430 Tactical Helicopter Squadron, Mobile Command, on April 26, 1971; No. 422 Tactical Helicopter Squadron, CFB Gagetown, Oromocto, N.B. on October 12, 1971; back to No. 430 Squadron on same day(?); Mobile Command, CFB Uplands, Ottawa, Ontario on June 27, 1972; storage at CFB Saskatoon, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan on October 3, 1972; available for disposal there from January 10, 1973; struck off on March 16, 1973; sold through CADC (Crown Assets Disposal Corporation); Royal Canadian Air Cadets on March 16, 1973; CF-TGA, first registered to Air Cadet League of Canada on April 9, 1974; taken on strength along with 16 other L-19s and four Cessna 182s; re-registered as C-FTGA by 1976; these were sublet to the Air Cadet League’s various provincial committees for glider towing and air cadet familiarization flying; 119702/702 based at CFB Comox (YQQ), Comox, Vancouver Island, B.C.

1954 Cessna L-19A-CE Bird Dog (Model 305A), c/n 23473, CF-TGB, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada; powered by one 213-hp Continental O-470-11 six-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with fixed-pitch two-blade McCauley propeller; tandem pilot and passenger, tow plane for Schweizer SGU 2-22 and Schweizer SGS 2-33 gliders; high-lift slotted wing flaps; built by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, Kansas at Wallace Plant, Wichita, Kansas (CE); BuNo 53-8052, US Army; taken on strength as 16703/703, RCAF on October 6, 1954, received in natural metal finish; No. 6 Repair Depot, RCAF Station Trenton, Trenton, Ontario for camouflage painting; No. 1 AOP (Air Observation Post) Flight, Camp Petawawa, Petawawa, Ontario on November 19, 1954; Bristol Aerospace, Winnipeg, Manitoba for Category B crash repairs on November 26, 1957; stored reserve at RCAF Station Lincoln Park, Calgary, Alberta on June 3, 1958; Army Aviation Flight, Camp Borden, Borden, Ontario on March 15, 1959 for “continuation of flying training of Army officers”; regular exercises with militia units in southern Ontario; Air Force Headquarters Practice Flight, RCAF Station Rockcliffe, Ottawa, Ontario on June 1, 1961; Army Aviation Tactical Training School, RCAF Rivers, Rivers, Manitoba on August 22, 1961; Training Command, RCAF Station Centralia, Exeter, Ontario on November 2, 1961; back to AATTS on January 8, 1962; RCAF Station Lincoln Park, Calgary, Alberta on June 7, 1962 for modifications; Bristol Aerospace, Winnipeg, Manitoba for modifications on January 9, 1963; back at AATTS by January 10, 1963; 4th Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, Camp Petawawa, Petawawa, Ontario on May 3, 1963; back at AATTS by February 19, 1964, following further modifications at Bristol Aerospace; 1 RCHA, Camp Gagetown, Oromocto, N.B. on May 12, 1964 for summer concentration training from June 15 to July 25, 1964; 4 RCHA, Camp Petawawa, Petawawa, Ontario on July 29, 1964; AOP (Air Observation Post) Troop, 3 RCHA, Camp Shilo, Shilo, Manitoba on January 12, 1965; back to 4 RCHA, Camp Petawawa, Petawawa, Ontario on April 27, 1965; last date as 16703/703 on June 11, 1970; became 119703/703, CAF; redesignated as CO-119 Bird Dog; first date on June 11, 1970, new serial number issued; with 2 RCHA, Camp Petawawa, Petawawa, Ontario when renumbered; loaned to No. 422 Tactical Helicopter Squadron, CFB Gagetown, Oromocto, N.B. from April 22 to May 10, 1971 for Combat Arms School training, then back to 2 RCHA; this unit absorbed by No. 427 Tactical Helicopter Squadron on April 26, 1971; storage at CFB Saskatoon, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan on October 3, 1972; available for disposal there from January 10, 1973; struck off on March 16, 1973; sold through CADC (Crown Assets Disposal Corporation); CF-TGB, first registered to British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada on July 9, 1973; taken on strength along with 16 other L-19s and four Cessna 182s; re-registered as C-FTGB by 1976; these were sublet to the Air Cadet League’s various provincial committees for glider towing and air cadet familiarization flying; 119703/703 based at CFB Comox (YQQ), Comox, Vancouver Island, B.C. for Air Cadet summer camps; registration cancelled on July 7, 1989.

1954 Cessna L-19A-CE Bird Dog (Model 305A), c/n 23479, CF-TGF, British Columbia Provincial Committee, Air Cadet League of Canada; powered by one 213-hp Continental O-470-11 six-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with fixed-pitch two-blade McCauley propeller; tandem pilot and passenger, tow plane for Schweizer SGU 2-22 and Schweizer SGS 2-33 gliders; high-lift slotted wing flaps; built by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, Kansas at Wallace Plant, Wichita, Kansas (CE); BuNo 53-8058, US Army; taken on strength as 16709/709, RCAF on November 15, 1954; delivered to storage at RCAF Station Lincoln Park, Calgary, Alberta; CJATC, Rivers Camp, Rivers, Manitoba on June 8, 1955; operated by Light Aircraft School, Rivers Camp, Rivers, Manitoba by October 1955; Bristol Aerospace, Winnipeg, Manitoba on November 20, 1959; still at CJATC in 1961, by which time unit was renamed Army Aviation Tactical Training School; Training Command, RCAF Station Centralia, Exeter, Ontario on January 8, 1962; back to AATTS on June 4, 1962; Bristol Aerospace, Winnipeg, Manitoba on February 19, 1964; 3rd Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, Camp Shilo, Shilo, Manitoba on December 28, 1965 for brief loan, then back to AATTS; Canadian Forces Navigational School, CFB Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Manitoba on February 19, 1968; No. 4 Flying Training School, CFB Rivers, Rivers, Manitoba on June 17, 1968; Bristol Aerospace, Winnipeg, Manitoba on October 4, 1968; back to Canadian Forces Navigational School, CFB Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Manitoba; back to No. 4 Flying Training School, CFB Rivers, Rivers, Manitoba on March 10, 1970, still there when renumbered; last date as 16709/709 on June 11, 1970; became 119709/709, CAF; redesignated as CO-119 Bird Dog; first date on June 11, 1970, new serial number issued; with No. 4 Flying Training School, CFB Rivers, Rivers, Manitoba when renumbered; storage at CFB Saskatoon, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan on June 12, 1970; No. 4 Flying Training School, CFB Portage la Prairie, Portage la Prairie, Manitoba on June 29, 1970, still there when this was absorbed by No. 3 Canadian Forces Flying Training School the next day; back to storage at CFB Saskatoon, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan on December 7, 1970; available for disposal there from January 10, 1973; struck off on March 16, 1973; sold through CADC (Crown Assets Disposal Corporation); CF-TGF, first registered to Air Cadet League of Canada on September 17, 1973; taken on strength along with 16 other L-19s and four Cessna 182s; re-registered as C-FTGF; these were sublet to the Air Cadet League’s various provincial committees for glider towing and air cadet familiarization flying; 119709/709 based at CFB Comox (YQQ), Comox, Vancouver Island, B.C.; visited Nanaimo Airport (YCD), Cassidy, Vancouver Island, B.C. in November 2005, registered C-FTGF but in original 5-digit Canadian Army markings and natural metal finish colour scheme.

Nanaimo Airport (YCD), informally known as Cassidy Airport, showing hangars, runways, and light aircraft, and the surrounding farms. Seen from the front seat of a Schweizer SGS 2-33A glider in spring 1978.

Schweizer SGS 2-33A seconds away from landing parallel to Runway 16. Two Air Cadets on lollipop duty at the edge of Taxiway Bravo, Nanaimo Airport (YCD). In the background is another Schweizer SGS 2-33A glider and the flight book recorders on the grass strip this side of the tarmac parallel to Runway 16/34. Air Cadets in the old blue-grey wool uniform, the 1941–1976 issue, in spring 1978.

[Agfa Agfamatic 100 sensor viewfinder 126 cartridge film camera, 42.1-mm f/11 lens; Agfa Agfacolor Special CNS 126 20 DIN/80 ASA 20-exposure colour negative cartridge film]

© Copyright photographs by Felix Hayo Scharnberg, 1978 / Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, October 2011

Monday, October 17, 2011

1991 Cessna 208A Caravan I, c/n 208-00212, C-GSFA, Whistler Air


1991 Cessna 208A Caravan I, c/n 208-00212, C-GSFA, Whistler Air (Whistler Air Services Ltd.), Whistler, B.C., Canada, based at Whistler Seaplane Port (YWS), Whistler, B.C.; powered by one 675-shp Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-114A turboprop engine with variable-pitch three-blade McCauley propeller; floats; pilot, nine passengers, utility transport; built by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, Kansas, USA at Pawnee Plant, Wichita, Kansas; N9828F, Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, Kansas; N9828F, Caravan Holding Corporation Trustee, Dover, Delaware on March 18, 1993, cancelled on November 2, 1993; 8Q-MAT, Maldivian Air Taxi; C-GSFA, John Hopkinson & Associates Ltd., Water Valley, Alberta on July 26, 1996, cancelled on September 26, 1996; C-GSFA, Slate Falls Airways (1987) Inc., Sioux Lookout, Ontario on August 26, 1996, cancelled on December 16, 1999; C-GSFA, Slate Falls Airways (1999) Inc., Sioux Lookout, Ontario on December 16, 1999, cancelled on January 7, 2008; owner registered since January 8, 2008; first Caravan on straight floats in the world.

Pitt Meadows Water Aerodrome (CAJ8) on the Fraser River, directly across from Barnston Island and adjacent to Pitt Meadows Regional Airport (YPK), Pitt Meadows, B.C. on Sunday, September 18, 2011 at 2:36 pm.

[Casio Exilim EX-Z20 point-and-shoot 8.1 MP digital camera, 38–114-mm f/3.1–5.9 lens]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, September 2011

1964 Boeing 727-25, c/n 18262/41, N8111N, “111”, Eastern Air Lines



1964 Boeing 727-25, c/n 18262/41, N8111N, “111”, marked Whisperjet on middle engine nacelle, Eastern Air Lines, New York City, New York, USA; powered by three 14,000-lbs thrust Pratt & Whitney JT8D-7B low-bypass turbofan engines; crew of three (pilot, co-pilot, flight engineer), 131 passengers, mid-size, narrow-body airliner; original short-body version, retrospectively designated -100 Series; built by The Boeing Company, Seattle, Washington at Renton, Washington; first flight on April 17, 1964; delivered on April 30, 1964; N8111N, Aviation Sales Co. Inc., Miami, Florida; broken up in September 1982.

In poor condition. Somehow the nose section, to just aft of the cockpit windows, found a resting place at the end of the Blades Aviation building. I first saw it on an early afternoon walk in the vicinity and on the airport grounds on Sunday, January 10, 2010. Pitt Meadows Regional Airport (YPK), Pitt Meadows, B.C., Canada on Sunday, September 18, 2011 at 2:59 pm.

[Casio Exilim EX-Z20 point-and-shoot 8.1 MP digital camera, 38–114-mm f/3.1–5.9 lens]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, September 2011

Tuesday, September 6, 2011

2011 Cessna T206H Turbo Stationair TC, c/n T206-08999, N899CS





2011 Cessna T206H Turbo Stationair TC, c/n T206-08999, N899CS, Cessna Aircraft Company, Independence, Kansas, USA; powered by one 310-hp Textron Lycoming TIO-540-AJ1A supercharged fuel-injected six-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with constant-speed, heated, three-blade McCauley propeller; pilot, five passengers, general aviation; Garmin G1000 avionics; built by Cessna Aircraft Company, Independence, Kansas at Wichita, Kansas; airworthiness issued on May 19, 2011; certificate issued on June 22, 2011.

The Stationair was first produced in 1966. It’s class competitors are the Piper 6XT and the Mooney Acclaim. The current model has a speed of 178 knots, or approximately 205 miles per hour with a range of 559 nautical miles. This demonstrator model was flown from the factory and promoted this summer by Kathy Wrobel, President of Prairie Aircraft Sales Ltd., Calgary/Springbank Airport (YBW), Springbank, Alberta, Canada.

She approached me as I was about to photograph the Stationair, asking if I was a pilot. I mentioned my obsession with aircraft, and this blog, Words & Wings. We chatted for a few minutes about this new Cessna, the current Cessna line, the new Cessna 162 Skycatcher, and that she recently sold four new Cessna 172 Skyhawks to Mont Royal College at Springbank Airport. Kathy tried to bring the 162 Skycatcher into Canada, but as Transport Canada currently has no classification or category for the model, she is working on having this changed. Then she kindly let me step behind the ropes to get the close-up photo of the cockpit. As a bonus she gave me a pristine copy of the large-format Stationair sales brochure, resplendent with beautiful, artistic photography. Thank you, Kathy.

The 49th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C. on Saturday, August 13, 2011 between 2:53 and 2:56 pm.

[Nikon Coolpix L20 point-and-shoot 10 MP digital camera, Nikkor 38–136-mm f/3.1–6.7 lens]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2011

de Havilland Canada DHC-3 Otter

de Havilland Canada DHC-3 Otter, construction number and registration unknown; powered by one 600-hp Pratt & Whitney R-1340-S1H1-G Wasp supercharged nine-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engine with constant-speed three-blade Hamilton Standard Hydromatic propeller; pilot, ten passengers, STOL (short take-off and landing) utility transport; built by de Havilland Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Canada at Downsview, Ontario.

The Annual Duncan Flying Club Fly-In, Duncan Airport (DUQ), Duncan, Vancouver Island, B.C. in June 1980.

* I was unable to decipher the Otters registration on the tail fin when I enlarged this scanned photograph. The only possible clues I do have are: 

- the pilot and possibly owner had the surname of Roberts, who I seem to recall living on Miller Rd. between the Glenora Rd. turn-off to Langtry Rd. and the airport, and Allenby Rd. that runs parallel to the Cowichan River at the outskirts of Duncan.

- the pilots son was at the Fly-In that day, riding his red bicycle with a banana seat, a few years younger than my brother and me. I seem to recall his name was Brad Roberts. I was almost 18 years old at the time. 

- Otters c/n 131 and c/n 307 were located and purchased in Nicaragua in 1979, shipped from Managua to Miami, trucked north to Montreal, then sold to York Realty Ltd. of Duncan, B.C. for parts used in rebuilding Otter c/n 288 into 1980. Is there a connection between the above Otter and York Realty? Is the above Otter c/n 288? The only Canadian registration I have unearthed for c/n 288 is C-GXRY, but the last two letters of the above-photographed Otter appear to be “YB”, “YD”, “YO”, or “YR”.

If anyone has any information as to which Otter this could possibly be, it would be much appreciated. I have searched several websites and blogs for clues, but it looks like I need to order a CD of Karl E. Hayes’ extensive Otter research, de Havilland Canada DHC-3 Otter: A History.

[Agfa Agfamatic 100 sensor viewfinder 126 cartridge film camera, 42.1-mm f/11 lens; Agfa Agfacolor Special CNS 126 20 DIN/80 ASA 20-exposure colour negative cartridge film]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, June 1980

Monday, July 25, 2011

1948 Cessna 120 X, c/n 14348X, C-FFLL


1948 Cessna 120 X, c/n 14348X, C-FFLL, Matti Koivula, Vancouver, B.C., Canada, based at Delta Heritage Airpark (CAK3), Delta, B.C.; powered by one 85-hp Continental C85-12F X four-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with fixed-pitch two-blade McCauley propeller; side-by-side pilot and passenger, general aviation; built by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, Kansas, USA; built as 120, c/n 14348; C-FFLL, John Ritchey, Lloydminster, Saskatchewan cancelled on April 9, 1985; C-FFLL, Gordon Larsen, Edmonton, Alberta on June 11, 1985, re-serialled and redesignated, cancelled on May 21, 2004; C-FFLL, Gordon Larsen and Phillip Larsen, Edmonton, Alberta on May 21, 2004, cancelled on December 17, 2009; owner registered since December 21, 2009.

Delta Heritage Airpark (CAK3), Delta, B.C. at 9:27 am, Friday, July 8, 2011.

[Nikon Coolpix L20 point-and-shoot 10 MP digital camera, Nikkor 38–136-mm f/3.1–6.7 lens]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, July 2011

1972 Cessna 172L Skyhawk, c/n 172-60104, C-GIYX


1972 Cessna 172L Skyhawk, c/n 172-60104, C-GIYX, Thomas Moffat, Richmond, B.C., Canada, based at Delta Heritage Airpark (CAK3), Delta, B.C.; powered by one 150-hp Lycoming O-320-E2D four-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with fixed-pitch two-blade McCauley propeller; pilot, three passengers, general aviation; built by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, Kansas, USA; N4204Q, W.J. Couvillan, Mequite, Texas on December 6, 1977, cancelled on February 17, 1978; imported in 1978; C-GIYX, A. Siemens Ltd., Vancouver, B.C. cancelled on April 6, 1984; owner registered since February 21, 1985.

Delta Heritage Airpark (CAK3), Delta, B.C. at 9:26 am, Friday, July 8, 2011.

[Nikon Coolpix L20 point-and-shoot 10 MP digital camera, Nikkor 38–136-mm f/3.1–6.7 lens]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, July 2011

Saturday, July 23, 2011

1948 Aeronca 11BC Chief, c/n 11BC-164, C-FJSS


1948 Aeronca 11BC Chief, c/n 11BC-164, C-FJSS, Tom Phillips, Vancouver, B.C., Canada, based at Delta Heritage Airpark (CAK3), Delta, B.C.; powered by one 85-hp Continental C85-8F four-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with fixed-pitch two-blade aluminum propeller; side-by-side pilot and passenger, general aviation; built by Aeronca Aircraft Corporation, Middletown, Ohio, USA at Dayton Municipal Airport, Vandalia, Ohio; C-FJSS, John Jeffries, Brooks, Alberta on November 24, 1989, cancelled on January 22, 1990; C-FJSS, Robert Olson, Jenner, Alberta on January 22, 1990, cancelled on February 11, 1992; C-FJSS, Garry Toop, Prince George, B.C. and Mark Grafton, Prince George, B.C. on April 29, 1992, cancelled on April 24, 1996; C-FJSS, Elmer Sanders, Grande Prairie, Alberta on April 24, 1996, cancelled on February 7, 2007; C-FJSS, Bradley Jorgenson, Richmond, B.C. on February 7, 2007, cancelled on April 10, 2008; C-FJSS, Charles Brown, Delta, B.C. on May 7, 2008, cancelled on July 30, 2008; owner registered since August 6, 2008.

Delta Heritage Airpark (CAK3), Delta, B.C. at 9:23 am, Friday, July 8, 2011.

[Nikon Coolpix L20 point-and-shoot 10 MP digital camera, Nikkor 38–136-mm f/3.1–6.7 lens]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, July 2011

Tuesday, July 5, 2011

1978 Davis DA-2A, c/n GDDA278, C-GSDS


1978 Davis DA-2A, c/n GDDA278, C-GSDS, Grant Sauerberg, Calgary, Alberta, Canada and David Sauerberg, Delta, B.C.; powered by one 100-hp Continental O-200-A four-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with fixed-pitch two-blade wood propeller; side-by-side pilot and passenger, amateur-built; built by Grant & David Sauerberg; registered on July 25, 1978, cancelled on November 8, 2002; C-GSDS, David Kirkeby, Strathmore, Alberta on November 8, 2002, cancelled on January 31, 2003.

The Annual Duncan Fly-In, Duncan Airport (DUQ), Duncan, Vancouver Island, B.C. in summer 1979.

[Agfamatic 100 viewfinder camera, Agfa Agfacolor Special CNS 126 20 DIN/80 ASA 20-exposure colour negative cartridge film]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, 1979

1952 de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver Mk. I, c/n 207, C-GJZQ



1952 de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver Mk. I, c/n 207, C-GJZQ, The Prospector, Beaukent Developments Inc., Richmond, B.C., Canada and C. Rogers, Vancouver, B.C.; powered by one 450-hp Pratt & Whitney R-985-AN-14B Wasp Junior supercharged nine-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engine with constant-speed three-blade Hartzell propeller; pilot, six passengers, STOL (short take-off and landing) utility transport; built by de Havilland Canada, Toronto, Ontario at Downsview, Ontario; delivered as L-20A-DH Beaver, BuNo 51-16771 US Army on March 15, 1952; redesignated as U-6A-DH Beaver in 1962; #1029, No. 30, 2nd Aviation Command; served in Korea and South Vietnam conflicts; BuNo 51-16771, Chico, based at Firebase Buttons, Song Be, South Vietnam; N65033; imported in 1981; C-GJZQ, Air North Charter & Training Ltd., Whitehorse, NWT cancelled on July 6, 1982; C-GJZQ, Air BC, Sea Island, Richmond, B.C. cancelled on July 22, 1983; C-GJZQ, Kynoc Chief, Waglisla Air, Bella Bella, B.C.; C-GJZQ, Jim Pattison Industries, Sea Island, Richmond, B.C. cancelled on October 17, 1984; C-GJZQ, Waglisla Air, Bella Bella, B.C. cancelled on August 1, 1985; C-GJZQ, Sharp Wings Ltd., Williams Lake, B.C. cancelled on September 23, 1985; C-GJZQ, Waglisla Air, Sea Island, Richmond, B.C. cancelled on November 18, 1986; C-GJZQ, Tyee Airways Ltd., Sechelt, B.C. cancelled on September 22, 1988; C-GJZQ, Waglisla Air, Sea Island, Richmond, B.C. cancelled on November 10, 1995; C-GJZQ, CBE Construction Ltd., Coal Harbour, B.C. on April 3, 1996; C-GJZQ, Seair Services 1990 Ltd., Sea Island, Richmond, B.C. cancelled on September 19, 1996; owners registered since October 22, 2003; fitted with Alaska door and 9-inch nose extension.

Harbour Air Seaplanes hangar, South Terminal, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C. at 11:49 am, Tuesday, December 21, 2010.

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, December 2010 

Monday, July 4, 2011

1949 Piper PA-16 Clipper, c/n 16-322, CF-YYN

1949 Piper PA-16 Clipper, c/n 16-322, CF-YYN, Soren Sorensen, Victoria, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada; powered by one 115-hp Lycoming O-235-C1 four-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with cruise-pitch two-blade Sensenich propeller; pilot, three passengers, general aviation; built by Piper Aircraft Company, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania, USA; registered on July 18, 1969, cancelled on June 10, 2002; exported to USA on December 23, 2003; N108PC, Wayne P. Hess, Terrebonne, Oregon on March 7, 2004.

The Annual Duncan Fly-In, Duncan Airport (DUQ), Duncan, Vancouver Island, B.C. in summer 1979.

[Agfamatic 100 viewfinder camera, Agfa Agfacolor Special CNS 126 20 DIN/80 ASA 20-exposure colour negative cartridge film]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, 1979

1978 Cessna 172N Skyhawk, c/n 172-70652, C-GDCS

1978 Cessna 172N Skyhawk, c/n 172-70652, C-GDCS, Glenn Simms, Vancouver, B.C., Canada, based at Boundary Bay Airport (YDT), Delta, B.C.; powered by one 160-hp Lycoming O-320-D2J four-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with fixed-pitch two-blade McCauley propeller; pilot, three passengers, general aviation; built by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, Kansas, USA; C-GYHD, Tweed Farm Equipment Ltd., Medora, Manitoba cancelled on July 11, 1984; C-GYHD, Lyle Hopf, Fort Kent, Alberta cancelled on August 5, 1988; C-GYHD, Raymond Selenski, Mankota, Saskatchewan on August 5, 1988, cancelled on February 6, 1990; C-GYHD, Scriber Farms Ltd., Lloydminster, Alberta on February 6, 1990, cancelled on June 21, 1991; C-GYHD, Dan Scriber, Lloydminster, Alberta on June 21, 1990; cancelled on July 12, 1991; C-GYHD, Maple Leaf Aviation Ltd., Brandon, Manitoba cancelled on July 20, 1982; C-GYHD, Northam Energy Consultants Ltd., Marwayne, Alberta on July 16, 1991, cancelled on July 2, 1992; C-GYHD, Upper Valley Aviation Ltd., Chilliwack, B.C. on August 5, 1992, cancelled on June 23, 1993; N70611, William P. Morgan, Oak Harbor, Washington on June 25, 1993, cancelled on April 7, 2011; imported in 2011; owner registered since May 4, 2011.

Temporarily engineless, Harbour Air Seaplanes hangar, South Terminal, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C. at 12:03 pm, Friday, June 17, 2011.

[Nikon Coolpix L20, s/n 51002451, point-and-shoot digital camera]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, June 2011

Saturday, July 2, 2011

1961 de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver Mk. I, c/n 1488, C-GIYV

1961 de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver Mk. I, c/n 1488, C-GIYV, Tyax Air Services Ltd., Gold Bridge, B.C., Canada, based at Gold Bridge, B.C.; powered by one 450-hp Pratt & Whitney R-985-39 Wasp Junior supercharged nine-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engine with constant-speed two-blade Hamilton Standard propeller; floats; pilot, six passengers, STOL (short take-off and landing) bushplane; built by de Havilland Canada, Toronto, Ontario at Downsview, Ontario; delivered as Beaver AL Mk. I, XP823, Army Air Corps, British Army on September 15, 1961; first flight on November 21, 1961; to AAC on Deccember 6, 1961; declared surplus on May 5, 1987; C-GIYV, Richard J. Churchill, Edmonton, Alberta on August 24, 1988; C-GIYV, Ward Wamboldt, Edmonton, Alberta on July 6, 1990; C-GIYV, Coast Western Airlines Ltd., Garden Bay, B.C. on August 22, 1990; C-GIYV, Richard J. Churchill, Edmonton, Alberta on June 4, 1991, leased until November 30, 1991; owner registered since December 2, 1994.

Near the Harbour Air Seaplanes hangar, South Terminal, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C. at 12:14 pm, Friday, June 17, 2011.

[Nikon Coolpix L20, s/n 51002451, point-and-shoot digital camera]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, June 2011 

1957 de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver Mk. I, c/n 1178, C-FYRR

1957 de Havilland Canada DHC-2 Beaver Mk. I, c/n 1178, C-FYRR, Blueskyview Software Corp., Vancouver, B.C., Canada, based at South Terminal, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C.; powered by one 450-hp Pratt & Whitney R-985-AN-14B Wasp Junior supercharged nine-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engine with constant-speed three-blade Hartzell propeller; amphibious floats; pilot, six passengers, STOL (short take-off and landing) utility transport; built by de Havilland Canada, Toronto, Ontario at Downsview, Ontario; delivered as L-20A-DH Beaver, BuNo 56-4435 US Army on January 31, 1958; redesignated as U-6A-DH Beaver in 1962; #1758, No. 759, 12th Aviation Command; N5329G in February 1976; imported in 1981; C-GKKJ, Beaver Air Services Ltd., The Pas, Manitoba cancelled on January 6, 1986; C-GKKJ, Leonard Brown, Thompson, Manitoba cancelled on June 30, 1986; C-GKKJ, Little Churchill Air Service, Thompson, Manitoba on March 20, 1987, cancelled on August 30, 1990; C-GKKJ, St. Theresa Point Air Services Ltd., St. Theresa Point, Manitoba on August 30, 1990, cancelled on September 26, 1994; C-GKKJ, Brian W. Kerr, West Vancouver, B.C. on November 4, 1994, cancelled on March 30, 2000; N481G, Galloo Island Aviation, Clayton, New York, USA on April 6, 2000, cancelled on July 17, 2007; imported in 2007; owner registered since July 19, 2007.

Near the Harbour Air Seaplanes hangar, South Terminal, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C. at 11:59 am, Friday, June 17, 2011.

[Nikon Coolpix L20, s/n 51002451, point-and-shoot digital camera]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, June 2011

Friday, July 1, 2011

1980 Cessna A185F Skywagon II, c/n 185-04104, C-GRLH

1980 Cessna A185F Skywagon II, c/n 185-04104, C-GRLH, Arctic Aerospace Inc., Sea Island, Richmond, B.C., Canada, based at South Terminal, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C.; powered by one 300-hp Continental IO-520-D fuel-injected six-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with constant-speed three-blade McCauley propeller; amphibious floats; Robertson STOL kit; six-seat (pilot, five passengers) utility transport; built by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, Kansas, USA; C-GRLH, C.E. Routh Trucking Co. Ltd., Campbell River, Vancouver Island, B.C. on October 21, 1980, cancelled on August 31, 1994; C-GRLH, Hodgkinson Equities Corporation, Vancouver, B.C. on August 31, 1994, cancelled on April 14, 2004; owner registered since April 14, 2004.

Lindair Services Ltd. hangar, South Terminal, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C. at 11:46 am, Friday, June 17, 2011.

[Nikon Coolpix L20, s/n 51002451, point-and-shoot digital camera]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, June 2011

1976 Cessna 182P Skylane, c/n 182-65068, C-GWWO

1976 Cessna 182P Skylane, c/n 182-65068, C-GWWO, Martin Aidelbaum, Vancouver, B.C., Canada, based at Langley Regional Airport (YNJ), Langley, B.C.; powered by one 230-hp Continental O-470-S six-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with constant-speed three-blade Hartzell propeller; amphibious floats; pilot, three passengers, general aviation; built by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, Kansas, USA; airworthiness issued on September 14, 1976; N7139S, Bruce E. Fowler Jr., Lago Vista, Texas on December 12, 2007, cancelled on November 4, 2008; imported in 2008; owner registered since November 5, 2008.

West Coast Air hangar, South Terminal, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C. at 11:38 am, Friday, June 17, 2011.

[Nikon Coolpix L20, s/n 51002451, point-and-shoot digital camera]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, June 2011

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

1968 Hawker Siddeley HS 748-233 Series 2A, c/n 1661, C-FYDY, Air North, Yukon’s Airline

1968 Hawker Siddeley HS 748-233 Series 2A, c/n 1661, C-FYDY, Air North, Yukon’s Airline at South Terminal, Vancouver International Airport (YVR/CYVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C., Canada on Friday, June 17, 2011 at 11:52 PDT

1968 Hawker Siddeley HS 748-233 Series 2A, c/n 1661, C-FYDY, Air North, Yukon’s Airline (Air North Charter and Training Ltd.), Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada, based at Erik Nielsen Whitehorse International Airport (YXY/CYXY), Whitehorse, Yukon
  • powered by two 2,190-shp Rolls-Royce Dart 7 Mk. 534-2 turboprop engines with variable-pitch four-blade Dowty Rotol propellers
  • crew of three (pilot, co-pilot, passenger attendant), between 4 and 40 passengers or up to 12,000 lbs of cargo depending on configuration, or configured as bulk fuel hauler with up to 10,000 lbs of fuel per trip, medium-range mid-size Combi passenger/freight conversion
  • built by Hawker Siddeley Aviation Limited, London, England at Manchester Woodford Aerodrome (XXB/EGCD), Woodford, Greater Manchester, England
  • first flight on November 27, 1968
  • VQ-FBH, Fiji Airways (Fiji Airways Limited), Nausori Airport (SUV/NFNA), Nausori, Viti Levu, Fiji from 1968 to 1970
  • change of airline name and headquarters to Air Pacific (Air Pacific Limited), Nadi International Airport (NAN/NFFN), Nadi, Viti Levu, Fiji in 1970
  • re-registered as DQ-FBH from 1970 to 1979
  • ZK-MCJ, Rotorua, Mount Cook Airline (Mount Cook Group), Christchurch, New Zealand in 1979
  • Mount Cook Airline owned by Air New Zealand Limited after 1989
  • registration cancelled in 1996
  • imported in 1996
  • registered to Air North, Yukon’s Airline on August 29, 1996
  • active

[Nikon Coolpix L20 point-and-shoot 10 MP digital camera, Nikkor 38–136-mm f/3.1–6.7 lens]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, June 2011

1962 de Havilland Canada DHC-3 Turbo Otter, c/n 427, C-FODX




1962 de Havilland Canada DHC-3 Turbo Otter, c/n 427, C-FODX, Arctic Aerospace Inc., Sea Island, Richmond, B.C., Canada, based at South Terminal, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C.; powered by one 750-hp Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-34 turboprop engine with constant-speed three-blade Hartzell propeller; amphibious floats; pilot, ten passengers, STOL (short take-off and landing) utility transport; built by de Havilland Canada, Toronto, Ontario at Downsview, Ontario; built as DHC-3 Otter, CF-ODX, powered by one 600-hp Pratt & Whitney R-1340-S1H1-G Wasp supercharged nine-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engine with constant-speed three-blade Hamilton Standard Hydromatic propeller; CF-ODX, Ontario Lands & Forests, Province of Ontario on September 25, 1962, floats/skis; CF-ODX, “67”, Ministery of Natural Resources, Province of Ontario, Sault Ste Marie, Ontario cancelled on July 17, 1990; C-FODX, Waweig Lake Outfitters Ltd., Thunder Bay, Ontario on April 19, 1994, cancelled on June 15, 1995; C-FODX, Wilderness North Air Limited, Thunder Bay, Ontario on June 15, 1995, cancelled on August 8, 1995; N644JJ, Aircraft Investments LLC, Oshkosh, Wisconsin; N644JJ, Arctic Aerospace LLC, Pahrump, Nevada on April 28, 1997, cancelled on May 11, 2011; imported in 2011; owner registered since May 12, 2011.

Near the West Coast Air and the Lindair Services Ltd. hangars, South Terminal, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C. at 11:44 am, Friday, June 17, 2011.

[Nikon Coolpix L20, s/n 51002451, point-and-shoot digital camera]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, June 2011