1944 Grumman G-21A Goose, c/n B-101, CF-VFU, FIFT. Dockside somewhere up Knight Inlet, B.C., Canada in spring 1969.

[1959 Kodak Retina IIIS (Type 027) rangefinder 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 86125, with Schneider-Kreuznach Retina-Xenon 50-mm f/1.9 Synchro Compur lens, s/n 6841319; Kodak Plus-X Pan (ISO 125/22°) 36-exposure black & white negative film]


© Copyright photograph by Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg, 1969 / Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, March 2011





“The whole history of the Canadian North can be divided into two periods—before and after the aeroplane.”
Hugh L. Keenleyside, Deputy Canadian Minister of Mines and Resources, October 1949




Tuesday, May 31, 2011

“Death in Blue” by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg


Bristol Blenheim Mk. IVF, T1807, LA-E, No. 235 Squadron, Coastal Command, RAF, based at RAF Bircham Newton, Norfolk, England since June 24, 1940; powered by two 920-hp Bristol Mercury XV supercharged nine-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engines with variable-pitch three-blade Hamilton Standard propellers; retractable landing gear; crew of three (pilot, navigator/observer, gunner), long-range fighter-reconnaissance; built by Bristol Aerospace Company, Royal West of England Academy, Bristol, England; built as Blenheim Mk. IV; converted to Blenheim Mk. IVF; armament of one .303-inch Browning machine gun in port wing; four fixed forward-firing .303-inch Browning machine guns in special ventral pack; manually-operated powered dorsal turret with two .303-inch Browning machine guns; four 250-lb bombs externally-mounted on underbelly of fuselage aft of ventral pack.

    
No. 235 Squadron crest, motto of Jaculamur humi (We strike them to the ground), badge is a double Wyvern spouting fire.

“Death in Blue”

The clear, blue sky, brushed by a few distant vapour trails, spun, twirled, in slow clockwise motion. Nothing but silence. Peace.

These were the days of the Battle of Britain. We left on a low-altitude coastal reconnaissance to the Dutch coastline in the early afternoon of September 13, 1940. The late-summer sun was already seasonally a little thinner. We were nearing the island of Texel in the province of North Holland. I was the dorsal turret gunner of the Bristol Blenheim Mk. IVF, T1807, call letters LA-E, a high-speed long-range fighter-reconnaissance aircraft. We had to be careful of Messerschmitt Bf 109s and Bf 110s with their 20-mm MG FF cannons, while looking for Heinkel He 111s, Junkers Ju 88s, and Dornier Do 17s. We were from No. 235 Squadron, based at RAF Bircham Newton, attached to Coastal Command, protecting and escorting shipping convoys from German maritime patrol aircraft and long-range bombers, running reconnaissance missions over the North Sea, and protecting downed Allied aircrews until rescue craft arrived. 

I swung my hydraulically-assisted gun turret of two Browning .303s the full 360 degrees in slow, steady ellipticals and lemniscates across the sky. It appeared to be a routine run flirting at the edges of boredom. I arced through the blinding sun. A short, deep jolt of pain followed a staccato burst from the golden glare. It cut through my chest. The aluminum and plexiglass dome came apart in shreds, shards, and strips. I was somersaulted into the blue. The roar of the two radial piston engines fell away. I was at peace as the light chop of the sea reached up to encircle me in her arms. Cold and yet warm at the same time.

I was a 19-year-old farmer’s son from a small village in West Yorkshire. The Royal Air Force meant life in an itchy blue-grey wool uniform, leather flight jacket, and leather flying helmet with flying goggles and oxygen mask.

We were pushed through a rapid training in ground and flight school. I joined No. 235 Squadron in late June 1940 with the rank of Sergeant, just days after it moved to Bircham Newton in the west of the county of Norfolk, eight miles west of Fakenham, on June 24, 1940. I was proud of our motto, Jaculamur humi (We strike them to the ground). No. 235 Squadron was formed on August 20, 1918 from Nos 424 and 425 Flights, RNAS, at the seaplane station at Newlyn, Cornwall, flying Short 184 seaplanes on anti-submarine patrols until the Armistice and disbanding on February 22, 1919. No. 235 was reformed as a fighter squadron at RAF Manston on October 30, 1939, receiving Fairey Battle light bombers for training purposes in December. In February 1940 the squadron was equipped with Blenheims and transferred from Fighter Command to Coastal Command on February 27, 1940 for fighter-reconnaissance duties. With the German invasion of the Low Countries in May 1940, No. 235 Squadron flew patrols over Holland.

Many times in childhood I awoke from nightmares of falling through the sky. They started in my ninth year. Bit by bit the past returned—the full-colour scenes, cinematic reels, running through my mind, through my sleep, each time a little more lucid. Mother or father would come to my bedside, always calm, singing German lullabies, saying a child’s prayer by Rudolf Steiner. I asked many questions about life, death, and life after death. By my teen years, studies of Steiner’s epistemological works and lectures were my solace, the key to my searching, feeding the spiritual yearning, while the image of falling through the sky filled itself with a life of memory, clear and concise in its delineations and details.

Around puberty in the summer of 1975, a few months shy of my 13th birthday, my fascination with aviation became an obsession, finding its fullest expression in all matters of World War Two aviation, but in particular with the RAF and the Battle of Britain. In September I joined the RCAirC (Royal Canadian Air Cadets) at 744 Cowichan Squadron with the sole intent of becoming a pilot. The blue-grey wool uniform was like coming home again.

Monday, May 30, 2011

1966 Bell 204B, c/n 2043, C-FOKY, Alpine Helicopters

1966 Bell 204B, c/n 2043, C-FOKY, Alpine Helicopters Ltd., Kelowna, B.C., Canada, based in Kelowna, B.C.; powered by one 1,100-shp Lycoming T53-L-11A turboshaft engine with two-blade main rotor and two-blade tail rotor; skids; crew of one or two (pilot, co-pilot), 8–9 passengers or equivalent cargo, multi-purpose utility transport; built by Bell Helicopter Company, Textron Inc., Hurst, Texas, USA; registered on May 26, 1975, cancelled on May 16, 1988; C-FOKY, Eagle Copters Ltd., Calgary, Alberta on May 5, 1988, cancelled on May 19, 1989; C-FOKY, Vancouver Island Helicopters Ltd., Sidney, Vancouver Island, B.C. on May 19, 1989, cancelled on August 11, 1989; C-FOKY, Les Hélicoptères Abitibi Ltée, La Sarre, Québec on August 24, 1989, cancelled on February 20, 1990; C-FOKY, Nationwide Helicopters Ltd., De Winton, Alberta on February 20, 1990, cancelled on March 3, 1992; C-FOKY, Conair Aviation Ltd., Abbotsford, B.C., operated as Frontier Helicopters, on April 28, 1992, cancelled on June 5, 1996; C-FOKY, Denendeh Helicopters Ltd., Hay River Dene Reserve, NWT on July 16, 1996, cancelled on January 23, 1997; C-FOKY, Venture Helicopters (M.K.C.) Incorporated, Calgary, Alberta on May 27, 1997, cancelled on April 20, 1998; C-FOKY, Provincial Helicopters Ltd., Lac Du Bonnet, Manitoba on May 26, 1998, cancelled on May 21, 2004; C-FOKY, Provincial Helicopters Ltd., Lac Du Bonnet, Manitoba on September 3, 2004, cancelled on June 3, 2005; C-FOKY, Hélicoptères Panorama Ltée/Panorama Helicopters Ltd., Alma, Québec on June 3, 2005, cancelled on May 26, 2006; C-FOKY, Hélicoptères Panorama Ltée/Panorama Helicopters Ltd., Alma, Québec on August 23, 2006, cancelled on May 26, 2010; C-FOKY, Hélicoptères Panorama Ltée/Panorama Helicopters Ltd., Alma, Québec on February 3, 2011, cancelled on March 24, 2011; C-FOKY, Eagle Copters Ltd., Calgary, Alberta on March 24, 2011, cancelled on June 16, 2011; C-FOKY, Black Swan Helicopters Ltd., Berwyn, Alberta on June 16, 2011.

The Annual Duncan Flying Club Fly-In, Duncan Airport (DUQ), Duncan, Vancouver Island, B.C. on Sunday, June 10, 1979.

[Agfa Agfamatic 100 sensor viewfinder 126 cartridge film camera, 42.1-mm f/11 lens; Agfa Agfacolor Special CNS 126 20 DIN/80 ASA 20-exposure colour negative cartridge film]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, June 1979

Sunday, May 29, 2011

1977 Maule M-5-235C Lunar Rocket, c/n 7132C, N9181E

1977 Maule M-5-235C Lunar Rocket, c/n 7132C, N9181E, Thomas G. Donnelly, Seattle, Washington, USA; powered by one 235-hp Lycoming O-540-J1A5D six-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with variable-pitch three-blade propeller; pilot, three passengers, STOL (short take-off and landing) general aviation; built by Maule Air, Inc., Moultrie, Georgia; airworthiness issued on August 30, 1977; owner registered since January 4, 1994.

The 48th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C., Canada on Saturday, August 14, 2010 at about 9:34 am.

[1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filter; Fujifilm Fujicolor Pro 160S 36-exposure colour negative film]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2010

Saturday, May 28, 2011

1975 Rockwell Commander 112, c/n 343, C-GICV

1975 Rockwell Commander 112, c/n 343, C-GICV, Jorn Graugaard, Abbotsford, B.C., Canada and Kevin Griffith, Abbotsford, B.C., based at Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C.; powered by one 200-hp Lycoming IO-360-C1D6 fuel-injected four-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with constant-speed two-blade Hartzell propeller; retractable landing gear; pilot, three passengers, general aviation; built by Rockwell International, USA; C-GICV, Joyce Woods, Calgary, Alberta cancelled on June 18, 1984; C-GICV, Gordon Kosolofski, Eston, Saskatchewan cancelled on July 5, 1985; C-GICV, GC Enterprises Inc., Chilliwack, B.C. on July 15, 1986, cancelled on June 6, 2000; C-GICV, Jorn Graugaard, Abbotsford, B.C./Boyd Chalmers, Abbotsford, B.C./Kevin Griffith, Abbotsford, B.C. on June 8, 2000, cancelled on January 22, 2009; owners registered since September 14, 2009.

The 48th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C. on Saturday, August 14, 2010 at about 9:33 am.

[1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filter; Fujifilm Fujicolor Pro 160S 36-exposure colour negative film]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2010

Thursday, May 26, 2011

1963 Beechcraft 23 Musketeer, c/n M-18, N2306Z

1963 Beechcraft 23 Musketeer, c/n M-18, N2306Z, Yvette J. Bellerive, Lynden, Washington, USA; powered by one 160-hp Lycoming O-320-D2B four-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with fixed-pitch two-blade Sensenich propeller; pilot, three passengers, general aviation; built by Beech Aircraft Corp., Wichita, Kansas; airworthiness issued on September 21, 1962; certificate issued on May 13, 2009.

The 48th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C., Canada on Saturday, August 14, 2010 at about 9:33 am.

[1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filter; Fujifilm Fujicolor Pro 160S 36-exposure colour negative film]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2010

Thursday, May 19, 2011

1996 Bombardier Learjet 31A, c/n 31A-120, C-GHJU

1996 Bombardier Learjet 31A, c/n 31A-120, C-GHJU, Helijet International Inc., Sea Island, Richmond, B.C., Canada, operated for BCAS (British Columbia Ambulance Service), based at South Terminal, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C.; powered by two 3,500-lbs thrust Garrett AiResearch TFE731-2-3B turbofan engines; crew of two (pilot and co-pilot), eight passengers, business aviation/air ambulance; built by Bombardier Aerospace, Dorval, Québec at Wichita, Kansas, USA; I-TYKE, Eurofly Service S.p.A., Aeroporto “Sandro Pertini”, Caselle Torinese, Turin (TO), Piedmont, Italy in 1996; N200TJ, JRW Aviation, Anchorage, Alaska on February 13, 2006; imported in 2007; owner registered since February 23, 2007.

The 48th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C. on Saturday, August 14, 2010 at 10:03 am.

[1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filter; Fujifilm Fujicolor Pro 160S 36-exposure colour negative film]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2010

1945 Avro Lancaster B.X (Type 683), c/n 3414, FM213, C-GVRA

1945 Avro Lancaster B.X (Type 683), c/n 3414, FM213, C-GVRA, marked as KB726/VR-A in wartime markings and colour scheme of No. 419 Squadron, RCAF, known as the “Mynarski Memorial Lancaster” as a memorial to Canadian VC recipient P/O Andrew Mynarski, Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, Mount Hope, Ontario, Canada, based at John C. Munro Hamilton International Airport (YHM), Mount Hope, Ontario; powered by four 1,620-hp Packard Merlin 224 supercharged V-format 12-cylinder, two-stage, liquid-cooled piston engines with variable-pitch, paddle-type, three-blade Hamilton Standard Hydromatic propellers; retractable landing gear; crew of seven (pilot, flight engineer, navigator, bomb aimer, wireless operator, mid-upper gunner, rear gunner), heavy bomber; built by Victory Aircraft, Malton, Ontario; taken on strength on August 21, 1945; stored at RCAF Trenton, Trenton, Ontario from 1945 to 1950; converted to Lancaster MK. 10MR by de Havilland Canada, Downsview, Ontario on August 28, 1950; first test flight in January 1952; assigned as VC-AGJ, No. 405 (MR) Squadron, RCAF Greenwood, Greenwood, Nova Scotia, suffered a heavy landing on ferry flight of January 15, 1952, centre section destroyed, repaired with parts from Lancaster B.X, KB895, rebuilt in July 1953, first test flight on August 26, 1953 by pilot Bob Fowler; during its service it had an incident occur on October 10, 1954 under the command of F/O J.K. Vincer, aircraft was to drop plasma on a vessel at night, and although the plasma wasn’t recovered the parachute and the marine marker hit the deck of the ship, an extraordinary feat, the next day another drop was successful in that the plasma was recovered from the sea by lifeboat; CX213/VC-AGS, No. 107 (UR) Squadron, RCAF Torbay, St. John’s, Newfoundland from August 1959 to August 1961; retired from active duty on November 6, 1963; struck off strength on June 30, 1964, into storage at RCAF Dunnville, Dunnville, Ontario; sold to The Royal Canadian Legion, Goderich, Ontario on July 1, 1964 for $1,200.00; stored at Sky Harbour Airfield in 1966; after necessary funds raised, displayed as VR-A on three pylons without structural alterations on September 15, 1968; many years in the open air; sold to CWH; transferred to CWH in 1977; removed from plinthe and tranported by No. 450 (Helicopter) Squadron to John C. Munro Hamilton International Airport (YHM), Mount Hope, Ontario on November 5, 1979; restored to airworthiness by CWH and Lancaster Support Club from March 24, 1983 to September 11, 1988; registered as C-GVRA on September 1, 1988; first flight again on September 11, 1988; minor damage in a hangar fire on February 15, 1993, repaired; damaged in a ground accident with a Boeing CH-47 Chinook helicopter at CWH on July 21, 2002, suffered propeller damage, repaired and returned to the air by August 2002; grounded due to corrosion found in the propeller blades but after an appeal for funding flew again in May 2009; many appearances across Canada and USA as the only airworthy Lancaster on the continent. 

The 48th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C. on Saturday, August 14, 2010 at about 8:36 am. 

[1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filter; Fujifilm Fujicolor Pro 160S 36-exposure colour negative film]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2010

Wednesday, May 18, 2011

1968 Cessna 180H Skywagon, c/n 180-51973, C-GYVA

1968 Cessna 180H Skywagon, c/n 180-51973, C-GYVA, Ocean Air Floatplanes Inc., Sidney, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada, based at Victoria Airport Water Aerodrome (CAP5), Patricia Bay, Sidney, Vancouver Island, B.C.; powered by one 230-hp Continental O-470-R six-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with constant-speed two-blade McCauley propeller; Edo 2960 floats; Horton STOL kit; pilot, five passengers, utility transport; built by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, Kansas, USA; imported in 1968; C-FXCQ, Sabourin Lake Airways Ltd., Cochenour, Ontario cancelled on June 10, 1983; C-FXCQ, Whitehead Moose, Pikangikum, Ontario on March 16, 1984, cancelled on December 11, 1987; C-FXCQ, Howey Bay Camps Limited, Red Lake, Ontario on December 11, 1987, cancelled on December 11, 1989; C-GYVA, Alvin Bancarz, Sherwood Park, Alberta on June 27, 2002, cancelled on September 4, 2002; C-GYVA, Canadian Institute of Aviation Technology Inc., Kelowna, B.C., operating as Air Hart Aviation, on September 16, 2002, cancelled on December 22, 2003; owner registered since January 20, 2004.

Just arrived, taxiing past the Harbour Air and West Coast Air seaplane docks for a Coal Harbour marina near the foot of Denman St., north of W. Georgia Street in the West End, Vancouver Harbour Water Airport (CXH), Vancouver, B.C. on Tuesday, August 3, 2010 at 11:16 am. 

Taxiing out at 11:32 am.

[Casio Exilim EX-Z20 point-and-shoot 8.1 MP digital camera, 38–114-mm f/3.1–5.9 lens]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2010

Tuesday, May 17, 2011

2000 Raytheon Beech B300 Super King Air 350, c/n FL-273, C-FVKC

2000 Raytheon Beech B300 Super King Air 350, c/n FL-273, C-FVKC, Carson Air Ltd., Kelowna, B.C., Canada, operated for BCAS (British Columbia Ambulance Service), based at Kelowna International Airport (YLW), Kelowna, B.C.; powered by two 1,050-shp Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-60A turboprop engines with constant-speed four-blade Hartzell propellers; retractable landing gear; crew of two (pilot and co-pilot), maximum 13 passengers, utility transport/air ambulance; built by Raytheon Company, Raytheon Aircraft Co., Wichita, Kansas, USA at Wichita, Kansas; N4473E, Sun Aviation Inc., Wichita, Kansas on May 5, 2000, cancelled on June 30, 2000; exported to Denmark; OY-JVL, Bulgari Operational Services ApS, Copenhagen, Denmark; imported in 2007; owner registered since March 22, 2007.

The 48th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C. on Saturday, August 14, 2010 at 10:02 am.

[1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filter; Fujifilm Fujicolor Pro 160S 36-exposure colour negative film]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2010

Monday, May 16, 2011

1947 Cessna 140, c/n 14027, CF-EKU




1947 Cessna 140, c/n 14027, CF-EKU, David ZoppaChilliwack, B.C., Canada, based at Chilliwack Airport (YCW), Chilliwack, B.C.; powered by one 85-hp Continental C85-12F four-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engine with fixed-pitch two-blade McCauley propeller; side-by-side pilot and passenger, general aviation; built by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, Kansas, USA; CF-EKU, Al and Lloyd Michaud, Vancouver U-Fly in August 1947; installed on floats by Brisbane Maintenance, Vancouver International Airport in September 1947; trained many student pilots; CF-EKU, Art Seller, Skyway Air Services Ltd., Langley, B.C.; C-FEKU, John Striloff, Abbotsford, B.C. on June 15, 1989, cancelled on November 26, 1990; C-FEKU, Vernon Hoeppner, Fort Smith, B.C. on November 26, 1990, cancelled on July 18, 1996; owner registered since July 18, 1996.

The 48th Annual Abbotsford International Airshow, Abbotsford International Airport (YXX), Abbotsford, B.C. on Saturday, August 14, 2010 at about 9:02 am.

[1984 Nikon FE2 SLR 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 1816483, with Nikkor AI 50-mm f/1.8 lens, s/n 2336591, and 52-mm polarizing filter; Fujifilm Fujicolor Pro 160S 36-exposure colour negative film]

© Copyright photographs by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, August 2010

1969 Ted Smith Aerostar 601, c/n 61-0003-1, C-FBBA

1969 Ted Smith Aerostar 601, c/n 61-0003-1, C-FBBA, Briwood Ltd., Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; powered by two 290-hp Lycoming TIO-540-S1A5 turbocharged fuel-injected six-cylinder, horizontally-opposed, air-cooled piston engines with constant-speed three-blade Hartzell propellers; retractable landing gear; pilot, five passengers, light transport; built by Ted Smith Aircraft Company, Santa Maria, California, USA at Van Nuys, California; registration cancelled on May 27, 1982; C-FBBA, Conair Aviation Ltd., Abbotsford, B.C. cancelled on July 16, 1982; C-FBBA, sale reported, cancelled on October 5, 1982; C-FBBA, Briwood Ltd., Burlington, Ontario cancelled on August 23, 1984; C-FBBA, Avion Sky Transport Inc., Rexdale, Ontario cancelled on May 7, 1985; C-FBBA, Conair Aviation Ltd., Abbotsford, B.C. cancelled on September 23, 1985; C-FBBA, Avion Sky Transport Inc., Rexdale, Ontario cancelled on May 13, 1986; C-FBBA, Conair Aviation Ltd., Abbotsford, B.C. cancelled on June 4, 1986; C-FBBA, Avion Sky Transport Inc., Rexdale, Ontario cancelled on January 21, 1987; C-FBBA, Dantove Enterprises Ltd., Thornhill, Ontario cancelled on June 10, 1987; C-FBBA, Conair Aviation Ltd., Abbotsford, B.C. cancelled on July 7, 1987; C-FBBA, Durham Automation Ltd., Oshawa, Ontario cancelled on June 14, 1988; C-FBBA, Conair Aviation Ltd., Abbotsford, B.C. on June 14, 1988, cancelled on September 14, 1988; C-FBBA, Durham Automation Ltd., Oshawa, Ontario on September 12, 1988, cancelled on June 15, 1989; C-FBBA, Conair Aviation Ltd., Abbotsford, B.C. on June 15, 1989, cancelled on September 21, 1989; C-FBBA, Durham Automation Ltd., Oshawa, Ontario on February 1, 1990, cancelled on July 11, 1990; C-FBBA, Conair Aviation Ltd., Abbotsford, B.C. on July 11, 1990, cancelled on January 2, 1991; C-FBBA, Durham Automation Ltd., Oshawa, Ontario on February 1, 1991, cancelled on September 30, 1991; C-FBBA, Auto Meilleur Ltée, Mont-Laurier, Québec on October 2, 1992, cancelled on March 8, 1996.

The Annual Duncan Flying Club Fly-In, Duncan Airport (DUQ), Duncan, Vancouver Island, B.C. on Sunday, June 10, 1979.

[Agfa Agfamatic 100 sensor viewfinder 126 cartridge film camera, 42.1-mm f/11 lens; Agfa Agfacolor Special CNS 126 20 DIN/80 ASA 20-exposure colour negative cartridge film]

© Copyright photograph by Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, June 1979

Tuesday, May 10, 2011

1946 Fairchild F-11-2 Husky, c/n 8, CF-SAQ, Island Airlines

1946 Fairchild F-11-2 Husky, c/n 8, CF-SAQ, Island Airlines, Campbell River, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada, based at Campbell River Seaplane Base (CAE3), Tyee Spit, Campbell River, Vancouver Island, B.C.; powered by one 550-hp Alvis Leonides 503/8 supercharged nine-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engine with constant-speed three-blade propeller; floats; crew of two (pilot and co-pilot), ten passengers, STOL (short take-off and landing) bushplane; freight-loading door on each side, rear-loading cargo door/ramp; built by Fairchild Aircraft Ltd. (Canada), Longueuil, Québec; built as F-11-1 Husky, powered by one 450-hp Pratt & Whitney R-985-AN-14B Wasp Junior supercharged nine-cylinder air-cooled radial piston engine with variable-pitch two-blade Hamilton Standard propeller; CF-SAQ, Air Ambulance Service, Department of Public Health, Government of Saskatchewan, Regina, Saskatchewan in 1947; CF-SAQ, Austin Airways, Timmins, Ontario; CF-SAQ, Parsons Airways Northern Ltd., Flin Flon, Manitoba in late 1960s(?); nicknamed “Sad And Queer”; engine conversion by KCR Industries, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Sea Island, Richmond, B.C. in 1966 or 1967(?); design rights acquired by Industrial Wings Ltd., subsidiary of Harrison Airways, Sea Island, Richmond, B.C., in 1970; CF-SAQ, West Coast Air Services Ltd., Sea Island, Richmond, B.C.; CF-SAQ, Island Airlines, Campbell River, Vancouver Island, B.C. on April 18, 1974, cancelled on June 17, 2001(?); apparently crashed in Strait of Georgia (according to one source); Island Airlines merged with Airwest Airlines, Gulf-Air Aviation, Haida Airlines, and West Coast Air Services Ltd. to form Air BC on December 1, 1980; one of three Huskys owned and operated by Island Airlines (one of the others was CF-EIR); one of only 12 ever built, of which six had their engines upgraded (F-11-1 Husky prototype, CF-BQC, c/n 1; CF-EIL/C-GCYV, c/n 2; CF-EIM-X/CF-EIM, c/n 3; CF-SAQ, c/n 8; CF-MAN, c/n 9; CF-EIR, c/n 12); six F-11-1 Huskys were not converted (CF-EIO, c/n 5; CF-EIP, c/n 6; CF-MAO, c/n 10; CF-BSH; CF-EIQ; CF-EIS).

Taxiing to a floating dock somewhere up Knight Inlet, B.C. sometime in the mid-1970s.

Seen from a right side window, Knight Inlet, B.C. sometime in the mid-1970s. 

[1959 Kodak Retina IIIS (Type 027) rangefinder 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 86125, with Schneider-Kreuznach Retina-Xenon 50-mm f/1.9 Synchro Compur lens, s/n 6841319]

© Copyright photographs by Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg, 1974 / Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, March 2011

Monday, May 9, 2011

1944 Grumman G-21A Goose, c/n B-101, CF-VFU, FIFT


1944 Grumman G-21A Goose, c/n B-101, CF-VFU, FIFT (Forest Industries Flying Tankers Ltd.), Sproat Lake, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada, based at Sproat Lake Seaplane Base (CAA9), Sproat Lake near Port Alberni, Vancouver Island, B.C.; powered by two 450-hp Pratt & Whitney R-985-AN-6 Wasp Junior supercharged nine-cylinder, single-row, air-cooled radial piston engines with constant-speed two-blade Hamilton Standard propellers. Dockside near the government wharf, Cowichan Bay, Vancouver Island, B.C. in summer 1968.

Dockside near the government wharf, Cowichan Bay, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada in summer 1968. Uwe and his forestry crew planted seedlings on the steep slopes of Knight Inlet, part of TFL (Tree Farm Licence) 17. The men in the photograph are unidentified. My father can not remember who they are. 

1944 Grumman G-21A Goose, c/n B-101, CF-VFU, FIFT (Forest Industries Flying Tankers Ltd.), Sproat Lake, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada, based at Sproat Lake Seaplane Base (CAA9), Sproat Lake near Port Alberni, Vancouver Island, B.C.; powered by two 450-hp Pratt & Whitney R-985-AN-14B Wasp Junior supercharged nine-cylinder, single-row, air-cooled radial piston engines with constant-speed three-blade Hartzell propellers; amphibious flying boat hull; crew of two (pilot and co-pilot), eight passengers, commercial transport; built by The Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation, Bethpage, Long Island, New York, USA at Plant 2, Bethpage, Long Island, New York (F); built as JRF-5 Goose (Model G-38), powered by two 450-hp Pratt & Whitney R-985-AN-6 Wasp Junior supercharged nine-cylinder, single-row, air-cooled radial piston engines with constant-speed two-blade Hamilton Standard propellers; delivered as BuNo 84806 to US Navy in November 1944; US Navy surplus in 1945; converted to G-21A Goose; N62899; imported to Canada in 1967; CF-VFU, FIFT, Sproat Lake, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada on April 7, 1967; engines upgraded, fitted with retractable floats and long-range fuel tanks in the wing centre section for a six-hour endurance; used to transport timber companies’ personnel; as my father was a treeplanting foreman with BCFP (British Columbia Forest Products), he and his crew flew on this aircraft up the central British Columbia coast in the late 1960s and early 1970s from Cowichan Bay on Vancouver Island to Knight Inlet; re-registered as C-FVFU; also used for forest patrols, support, and spotter, lead-in aircraft for FIFT’s two Martin JRM-3 Mars water bombers from 1980 to 1988; registration cancelled on September 28, 2001; registration renewed as C-FVFU, Flying Tankers Inc., Sproat Lake, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada on September 28, 2001; fitted with the extended dorsal fin; visited Groningen Airport Eelde (GRQ), Eelde, Drenthe, Netherlands on November 9, 2001 en route to Austria and Croatia; registration cancelled on February 6, 2002; over 15,000 airframe hours; C-FVFU, C-Tec Ltd., Saint John, N.B., Canada on February 6, 2002; leased(?) as C-FVFU to European Coastal Airlines, Zagreb, Croatia; named Aline; refurbished at Salzburg Airport (SZG), Salzburg, Austria in March 2002; still carrying Canadian registration C-FVFU while operating in Croatia, even though registration cancelled on July 5, 2005 and deleted from Transport Canada website on July 8, 2005, therefore registration no longer valid; should be carrying Croatian registration, prefixed with code 9A-; European Coastal Airlines, established in September 2000, AOC issued in 2001, put on hold after September 11, 2001, re-launched in 2007, then attempted to launch scheduled services in 2008, AOC expired, commercial operation announced three times, failed three times, never in commercial operation in Croatia despite much promotion for over ten years; plans were for C-FVFU to fly regular scheduled flights between Zagreb and Mali Losinj, Zagreb and Rab, Zagreb and Rijeka, Pula and Rijeka (Flight Timetable valid on July 1, 2008 in planning phase and not yet activated); European Coastal Airlines expansion plans reported in July 2010; fleet includes one Lake LA-4-200 Buccaneer, two (plus six ordered) de Havilland Canada DHC-6 Twin Otters, and the Grumman G-21A Goose; launch of expanded services announced for May 2011; this Goose is an Annex II aircraft under EASA, no commercial operations (JAR Ops 1) allowed, apparently reason why still carrying Canadian registration; current status unknown.

Following year with engines and propellers upgraded, and fitted with retractable floats and long-range fuel tanks in the wing centre section for a six-hour endurance. Dockside somewhere up Knight Inlet, B.C., Canada in spring 1969.

Dockside somewhere up Knight Inlet, B.C., Canada in spring 1969. Forestry crew are unidentified.

[1959 Kodak Retina IIIS (Type 027) rangefinder 35-mm roll film camera, s/n 86125, with Schneider-Kreuznach Retina-Xenon 50-mm f/1.9 Synchro Compur lens, s/n 6841319; Kodak Plus-X Pan (ISO 125/22°) 36-exposure black & white negative film]

© Copyright photographs by Uwe Kündrunar Scharnberg, 1968–1969 / Stephan Alexander Scharnberg, March 2011

Friday, May 6, 2011

“High Flight” by John Gillespie Magee, Jr.

Oh, I have slipped the surly bonds of Earth
And danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings;
Sunward I’ve climbed, and joined the tumbling mirth
Of sun-split clouds,—and done a hundred things
You have not dreamed of—wheeled and soared and swung
High in the sunlit silence. Hov’ring there,
I’ve chased the shouting wind along, and flung
My eager craft through footless halls of air....

Up, up the long, delirious burning blue
I’ve topped the wind-swept heights with easy grace
Where never lark, or ever eagle flew—
And, while with silent, lifting mind I’ve trod
The high untrespassed sanctity of space,
Put out my hand, and touched the face of God.